Search Results for: The Transformation Of Historical Research In The Digital Age

The Transformation of Historical Research in the Digital Age

The Transformation of Historical Research in the Digital Age

Author: Ian Milligan

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781009027472

Category: History

Page: 143

View: 478

Historians make research queries on Google, ProQuest, and the HathiTrust. They garner information from keyword searches, carried out across millions of documents, their research shaped by algorithms they rarely understand. Historians often then visit archives in whirlwind trips marked by thousands of digital photographs, subsequently explored on computer monitors from the comfort of their offices. They may then take to social media or other digital platforms, their work shaped through these new forms of pre- and post-publication review. Almost all aspects of the historian's research workflow have been transformed by digital technology. In other words, all historians – not just Digital Historians – are implicated in this shift. The Transformation of Historical Research in the Digital Age equips historians to be self-conscious practitioners by making these shifts explicit and exploring their long-term impact. This title is also available as Open Access on Cambridge Core.

Doing History: Research and Writing in the Digital Age

Doing History: Research and Writing in the Digital Age

Author: Michael J. Galgano

Publisher: Cengage Learning

ISBN: 9781285402314

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 350

DOING HISTORY: RESEARCH AND WRITING IN THE DIGITAL AGE presents a soup to nuts approach to researching and writing about history, with an eye for making the most of current technology. The authors begin their straightforward approach with an overview of the discipline. Then, they lay out a systematic approach to research, including how to locate and analyze sources (both primary and secondary), how to write the paper and cite research properly, and how to present the work in conferences. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Collaborative Historical Research in the Age of Big Data

Collaborative Historical Research in the Age of Big Data

Author: Ruth Ahnert

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781009188432

Category: History

Page: 152

View: 826

Living with Machines is the largest digital humanities project ever funded in the UK. The project brought together a team of twenty-three researchers to leverage more than twenty-years' worth of digitisation projects in order to deepen our understanding of the impact of mechanisation on nineteenth-century Britain. In contrast to many previous digital humanities projects which have sought to create resources, the project was concerned to work with what was already there, which whilst straightforward in theory is complex in practice. This Element describes the efforts to do so. It outlines the challenges of establishing and managing a truly multidisciplinary digital humanities project in the complex landscape of cultural data in the UK and share what other projects seeking to undertake digital history projects can learn from the experience. This title is also available as Open Access on Cambridge Core.

Writing History in the Digital Age

Writing History in the Digital Age

Author: Jack Dougherty

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472052066

Category: History

Page: 299

View: 615

"Writing History in the Digital Age began as a one-month experiment in October 2010, featuring chapter-length essays by a wide array of scholars with the goal of rethinking traditional practices of researching, writing, and publishing, and the broader implications of digital technology for the historical profession. The essays and discussion topics were posted on a WordPress platform with a special plug-in that allowed readers to add paragraph-level comments in the margins, transforming the work into socially networked texts. This first installment drew an enthusiastic audience, over 50 comments on the texts, and over 1,000 unique visitors to the site from across the globe, with many who stayed on the site for a significant period of time to read the work. To facilitate this new volume, Jack Dougherty and Kristen Nawrotzki designed a born-digital, open-access platform to capture reader comments on drafts and shape the book as it developed. Following a period of open peer review and discussion, the finished product now presents 20 essays from a wide array of notable scholars, each examining (and then breaking apart and reexamining) how digital and emergent technologies have changed the ways that historians think, teach, author, and publish"--

Museums in a Digital Age

Museums in a Digital Age

Author: Ross Parry

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135666316

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 496

View: 492

The influence of digital media on the cultural heritage sector has been pervasive and profound. Today museums are reliant on new technology to manage their collections. They collect digital as well as material things. New media is embedded within their exhibition spaces. And their activity online is as important as their physical presence on site. However, ‘digital heritage’ (as an area of practice and as a subject of study) does not exist in one single place. Its evidence base is complex, diverse and distributed, and its content is available through multiple channels, on varied media, in myriad locations, and different genres of writing. It is this diaspora of material and practice that this Reader is intended to address. With over forty chapters (by some fifty authors and co-authors), from around the world, spanning over twenty years of museum practice and research, this volume acts as an aggregator drawing selectively from a notoriously distributed network of content. Divided into seven parts (on information, space, access, interpretation, objects, production and futures), the book presents a series of cross-sections through the body of digital heritage literature, each revealing how a different aspect of curatorship and museum provision has been informed, shaped or challenged by computing. Museums in a Digital Age is a provocative and inspiring guide for any student or practitioner of digital heritage.

History Education in the Digital Age

History Education in the Digital Age

Author: Mario Carretero

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783031107436

Category: Education

Page: 231

View: 922

This book reflects on how teachers and students use new technologies in classroom settings in order to improve the capacity of teaching and learning in history to successfully meet the challenges of the twenty-first century through a complex understanding of the relation between past and present. Key authors in the field from Europe and the Americas present a comprehensive overview of the central questions at the heart of the book. They contribute to this process of reflection by taking diverse methodological, pedagogical and conceptual approaches to analyse the ways in which digital tools could advance the development of historical comprehension in the fields of formal and informal history education in different settings as schools, museums, exhibitions, sites of memory, videogames and films. Drawing together a disciplinary diversity that approaches the topic from the viewpoints of collective memory, global history, historical thinking and historical consciousness, the book’s cutting-edge content offers interested academics and practitioners with a broad-based view on the current state of debate in this area, examined via theoretical exploration in-depth case analysis.

Anthropological Data in the Digital Age

Anthropological Data in the Digital Age

Author: Jerome W. Crowder

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030249250

Category: Social Science

Page: 270

View: 787

For more than two decades, anthropologists have wrestled with new digital technologies and their impacts on how their data are collected, managed, and ultimately presented. Anthropological Data in the Digital Age compiles a range of academics in anthropology and the information sciences, archivists, and librarians to offer in-depth discussions of the issues raised by digital scholarship. The volume covers the technical aspects of data management—retrieval, metadata, dissemination, presentation, and preservation—while at once engaging with case studies written by cultural anthropologists and archaeologists returning from the field to grapple with the implications of producing data digitally. Concluding with thoughts on the new considerations and ethics of digital data, Anthropological Data in the Digital Age is a multi-faceted meditation on anthropological practice in a technologically mediated world.

Privacy and Security in the Digital Age

Privacy and Security in the Digital Age

Author: Michael Friedewald

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317661061

Category: Social Science

Page: 206

View: 491

Privacy and data protection are recognized as fundamental human rights. Recent developments, however, indicate that security issues are used to undermine these fundamental rights. As new technologies effectively facilitate collection, storage, processing and combination of personal data government agencies take advantage for their own purposes. Increasingly, and for other reasons, the business sector threatens the privacy of citizens as well. The contributions to this book explore the different aspects of the relationship between technology and privacy. The emergence of new technologies threaten increasingly privacy and/or data protection; however, little is known about the potential of these technologies that call for innovative and prospective analysis, or even new conceptual frameworks. Technology and privacy are two intertwined notions that must be jointly analyzed and faced. Technology is a social practice that embodies the capacity of societies to transform themselves by creating the possibility to generate and manipulate not only physical objects, but also symbols, cultural forms and social relations. In turn, privacy describes a vital and complex aspect of these social relations. Thus technology influences people’s understanding of privacy, and people’s understanding of privacy is a key factor in defining the direction of technological development. This book was originally published as a special issue of Innovation: The European Journal of Social Science Research.

Young Children Playing and Learning in a Digital Age

Young Children Playing and Learning in a Digital Age

Author: Christine Stephen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317224976

Category: Education

Page: 160

View: 269

Young Children Playing and Learning in a Digital Age explores the emergence of the digital age and young children’s experiences with digital technologies at home and in educational environments. Drawing on theory and research-based evidence, this book makes an important contribution to understanding the contemporary experiences of young children in the digital age. It argues that a cultural and critically informed perspective allows educators, policy-makers and parents to make sense of children’s digital experiences as they play and learn, enabling informed decision-making about future early years curriculum and practices at home and in early learning and care settings. An essential read for researchers, students, policy-makers and professionals working with children today, this book draws attention to the evolution of digital developments and the relationship between contemporary technologies, play and learning in the early years.

Hegemony in the Digital Age

Hegemony in the Digital Age

Author: Stephen M. E. Marmura

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 9780739146545

Category: Social Science

Page: 184

View: 727

Internet technology has arguably changed the rules by which individuals, social movements, and institutions compete for political and cultural influence in technologically advanced societies. The author considers this reality through reference to the concept of hegemony; looking to the ways in which diverse actors in American civil society compete with one another while simultaneously challenging dominant sources of authority. The Arab/Israeli conflict is drawn upon as a boundary object holding direct interest to a wide range of state-aligned lobbies, broadly-based social movements, and marginalized 'extremist' groups, each of which hopes to affect the course of U.S. Mid-East policy. While various dimensions of internet use and activism are explored, Stephen Marmura directs particular attention to the importance and limitations of the World Wide Web as a mass medium. Examining phenomena ranging from mainstream news dissemination to the propaganda warfare visible online amongst racist, religious fundamentalist, and ultra-nationalist organizations, he argues the Net's greatest advantages are ultimately accrued by those most vested in the political status quo. Marmura argues further that widespread use of the Web is likely contributing to processes of social fragmentation, even as it reinforces ideological discourses favorable to state power.

The Dangers of Gifts from Antiquity to the Digital Age

The Dangers of Gifts from Antiquity to the Digital Age

Author: Alexandra Urakova

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781000651614

Category: History

Page: 268

View: 800

This is the first volume that examines dangerous gift-giving across centuries and disciplines. Bringing to the fore the subject that features as an aside in gift studies, it offers new insights into the ambivalent and troubled history of gift-giving. Dangerous, violent, and self-destructive gift-giving remains an alluring challenge for scholars almost a hundred years after Marcel Mauss’s landmark work on the gift. Globally, the notion of toxic and fateful gifts has haunted mythologies, folklores, and literatures for millennia. This book problematizes what stands behind the notion of the 'dangerous gift' and demonstrates how this operational term may help us to better understand the role and place of gift-giving from antiquity to the present through a series of case studies ranging from ancient Zoroastrianism to modern digital dating. The book develops a complex historical, cross-cultural, and multi-disciplinary approach to gift-giving that invites comparisons between various facets of this phenomenon through time and across societies. The book will interest a wide range of scholars working in anthropology, history, literary criticism, religious studies, and contemporary digital culture. It will primarily appeal to university educators and researchers of political culture, pre-modern religion, social relations, and the relationship between commerce and gifts.