Search Results for: The Oregon Trail

The Oregon Trail

The Oregon Trail

Author: Steven P. Olson

Publisher: The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc

ISBN: 082394512X

Category: History

Page: 68

View: 140

Uses primary source documents, narrative, and illustrations to recount the history of the Oregon Trail, its role in westward expansion, and the travails of the pioneers who followed it across the West.

The Oregon Trail, Yesterday & Today

The Oregon Trail, Yesterday & Today

Author: William Hill

Publisher: Caxton Press

ISBN: 0870045601

Category: Oregon National Historic Trail

Page: 197

View: 780

Here lies a description of the history of the Oregon Trail - from past to present. It is a unique blend of maps, guides, emigrant diaries and journals, old drawings and paintings, together with recent photographs. This book tells the story of the Oregon Trail in an interesting, easy to read manner and is packed with information for everyone -- the armchair traveler, the tourist, the historian and the Oregon Trail buff.

The Oregon Trail

The Oregon Trail

Author: Tim McNeese

Publisher: Infobase Publishing

ISBN: 9781604130270

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 149

View: 442

A history of the Oregon Trail follows the route used by fur traders, mountain men, farmers, gold hunters, entrepreneurs, and others who made their way west, offering stories about the hardships and triumphs of the massive migration.

Oregon Trail Cooking

Oregon Trail Cooking

Author: Mary Gunderson

Publisher: Capstone

ISBN: 9780736803557

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 36

View: 857

Discusses the everyday life, family roles, cooking methods, and common foods of pioneers who traveled west on the Oregon Trail during the nineteenth century. Includes recipes.

The Oregon Trail

The Oregon Trail

Author: Francis Parkman

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803287399

Category: History

Page: 878

View: 868

The Oregon Trail is the gripping account of Francis Parkman's journey west across North America in 1846. After crossing the Allegheny Mountains by coach and continuing by boat and wagon to Westport, Missouri, he set out with three companions on a horseback journey that would ultimately take him over two thousand miles. Map.

How Many People Traveled the Oregon Trail?

How Many People Traveled the Oregon Trail?

Author: Miriam Aronin

Publisher: Lerner Publications

ISBN: 9780761388302

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 48

View: 423

In the spring of 1843, nearly one thousand people gathered in Independence, Missouri. They came from all over the eastern United States, and many had to sell most of their possessions to afford the trip. Yet their journey was just beginning. The group set out for Oregon Country, a four- to six-month trek across plains, mountains, valleys, and rivers. Not everyone survived the difficult trip. Still, before the end of the 1800s, many more wagon trains would travel the Oregon Trail to reach what became the western United States.So why were Americans moving west?What hardships would they face on the journey?And who blazed the Oregon Trail?Discover the facts about this important trail west and how it affected U.S. history.

The Oregon Trail

The Oregon Trail

Author: Karen Bush Gibson

Publisher: Nomad Press

ISBN: 9781619305731

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 130

View: 598

Westward ho! If you travel across certain parts of the United States, you can still see wagon wheel ruts where people crossed the west in search of more opportunity and better lives more than 200 years ago! The Oregon Trail: The Journey Across the Country from Lewis and Clark to the Transcontinental Railroad offers readers ages 9 to 12 a fascinating look at the explorers and settlers who traveled this route during the westward expansion of the United States. When America received its independence in 1776, the new country was made up of 13 colonies that became the United States of America. European immigrants continued to arrive in the new country, eager to make new lives for themselves and their families. By 1803, there were 17 states and a need for even more space. The United States doubled its land area with the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. President Thomas Jefferson commissioned the Corps of Discovery to explore and map a territory that had only been seen by fur trappers and the Native Americans who lived there. The expedition into the American west, more popularly known as the Lewis and Clark expedition, left from Independence, Missouri for more than two years of exploration that produced a route for American settlers to take. The route was the Oregon Trail, also known as the Oregon and California Trail. In The Oregon Trail: The Journey Across the Country from Lewis and Clark to the Transcontinental Railroad, readers ages 9 to 12 can delve into the explorations of Meriwether Lewis and William Clark and other explorers. They can learn about the more than half a million people who followed during the nineteenth century. What challenges did these pioneers face on the 2,170-mile journey? How were Native American tribes and nations affected by this mass migration? Primary sources allow readers to feel like a part of the Oregon Trail experience while biographical sidebars will introduce the compelling people who were part of this time in U.S. history. Investigative, hands-on projects and critical thinking activities such as writing a treaty and researching artistic impressions of the Oregon Trail invite readers to further their understanding of life on the trail, early towns and forts, and the Transcontinental Railroad that followed the wagons into new lands and territories that would eventually become states.

The Oregon Trail

The Oregon Trail

Author: Rinker Buck

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781451659160

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 492

In the bestselling tradition of Bill Bryson and Tony Horwitz, Rinker Buck's The Oregon Trail is a major work of participatory history: an epic account of traveling the 2,000-mile length of the Oregon Trail the old-fashioned way, in a covered wagon with a team of mules—which hasn't been done in a century—that also tells the rich history of the trail, the people who made the migration, and its significance to the country. Spanning 2,000 miles and traversing six states from Missouri to the Pacific Ocean, the Oregon Trail is the route that made America. In the fifteen years before the Civil War, when 400,000 pioneers used it to emigrate West—historians still regard this as the largest land migration of all time—the trail united the coasts, doubled the size of the country, and laid the groundwork for the railroads. The trail years also solidified the American character: our plucky determination in the face of adversity, our impetuous cycle of financial bubbles and busts, the fractious clash of ethnic populations competing for the same jobs and space. Today, amazingly, the trail is all but forgotten. Rinker Buck is no stranger to grand adventures. The New Yorker described his first travel narrative,Flight of Passage, as “a funny, cocky gem of a book,” and with The Oregon Trailhe seeks to bring the most important road in American history back to life. At once a majestic American journey, a significant work of history, and a personal saga reminiscent of bestsellers by Bill Bryson and Cheryl Strayed, the book tells the story of Buck's 2,000-mile expedition across the plains with tremendous humor and heart. He was accompanied by three cantankerous mules, his boisterous brother, Nick, and an “incurably filthy” Jack Russell terrier named Olive Oyl. Along the way, Buck dodges thunderstorms in Nebraska, chases his runaway mules across miles of Wyoming plains, scouts more than five hundred miles of nearly vanished trail on foot, crosses the Rockies, makes desperate fifty-mile forced marches for water, and repairs so many broken wheels and axels that he nearly reinvents the art of wagon travel itself. Apart from charting his own geographical and emotional adventure, Buck introduces readers to the evangelists, shysters, natives, trailblazers, and everyday dreamers who were among the first of the pioneers to make the journey west. With a rare narrative power, a refreshing candor about his own weakness and mistakes, and an extremely attractive obsession for history and travel,The Oregon Trail draws readers into the journey of a lifetime.

The Oregon Trail

The Oregon Trail

Author: Benjamin Proudfit

Publisher: Gareth Stevens Publishing LLLP

ISBN: 9781482449563

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 26

View: 629

For more than three decades in the mid-1800s, the Oregon Trail was the main way settlers traveled west. Today, people can visit parts of this historic trail, and even walk where pioneers did as they made their way to new lives in the Pacific Northwest and California. Complemented by full-color photographs, the main content addresses the historical context of the trail to supplement the social studies curriculum. Fact boxes offer tips to those traveling along the trail and suggest cool, quirky, and fun destinations near it.

Exploring the Oregon Trail

Exploring the Oregon Trail

Author: Kay W. Scott

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781493066087

Category: Travel

Page: 209

View: 439

The Oregon Trail, the route of the pioneers during the largest mass migration in United States history, was a long and difficult journey made by Americans nearly two centuries ago. This guidebook, rich with photos, interviews, and information about the famous landmarks, facilities, individuals, activities, and towns along the trail, will please both adventurers planning to travel the trail and individuals who wish to learn about and follow the trail from an easy chair. Complete with maps and details of each state from Missouri to Oregon, Exploring the Oregon Trail will give readers everything needed to follow in the footsteps of the American pioneers.