Search Results for: The Master And His Emissary

The Master and His Emissary

The Master and His Emissary

Author: Iain McGilchrist

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300245929

Category: Psychology

Page: 616

View: 649

A new edition of the bestselling classic – published with a special introduction to mark its 10th anniversary This pioneering account sets out to understand the structure of the human brain – the place where mind meets matter. Until recently, the left hemisphere of our brain has been seen as the ‘rational’ side, the superior partner to the right. But is this distinction true? Drawing on a vast body of experimental research, Iain McGilchrist argues while our left brain makes for a wonderful servant, it is a very poor master. As he shows, it is the right side which is the more reliable and insightful. Without it, our world would be mechanistic – stripped of depth, colour and value.

The Kingdom, the Power and the Glory : Western Yoga

The Kingdom, the Power and the Glory : Western Yoga

Author: Craig J. Leggat

Publisher: Balboa Press

ISBN: 9781504322232

Category: Self-Help

Page: 184

View: 634

Western Yoga has been taught for about 3,000 years. It is the source of western civilisation and democracy. Western Yoga is very different to the yoga of India that is taught in yoga schools today around the world. Pythagoras, Socrates, Plato and Aristotle learned Western Yoga and then taught it in their Mystery Schools.

The Aesthetics of Discipleship

The Aesthetics of Discipleship

Author: Adrian Coates

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781725272385

Category: Religion

Page: 256

View: 742

Discipleship is embodied. Formation in the Christian life is not an otherworldly exercise but one that plays out in this world, interwoven with everyday sensory experience in ordinary life. The Aesthetics of Discipleship explores this dynamic through Kierkegaard's framing of "aesthetic existence"--the sensory experience of being "in the moment"--further developed by Bonhoeffer, as operating within a realm of freedom, encompassing not only art but play, friendship, and cultural formation. In addition to Kierkegaard and Bonhoeffer, the work of Iain McGilchrist, Graham Ward, and Nicholas Wolterstorff is employed to offer a fresh perspective on discipleship, "from below": Everyday sensory experiences are integral not only to being human but to the practice of discipleship, such that discipleship integrates aesthetic, ethical, and religious existence. Aesthetic existence unhinged from a life of faith or fueled by distorted Christendom creates and sustains aestheticized pseudorealities centered on the self. Mature aesthetic existence, however, anchored in love for God, plays a fundamental role in the Christian life, both as the incarnational celebration of being fully human, and also through the preconscious formation of imaginaries by which we live.

Ways of Attending

Ways of Attending

Author: Iain McGilchrist

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429788697

Category: Psychology

Page: 32

View: 249

Attention is not just receptive, but actively creative of the world we inhabit. How we attend makes all the difference to the world we experience. And nowadays in the West we generally attend in a rather unusual way: governed by the narrowly focussed, target-driven left hemisphere of the brain. Forget everything you thought you knew about the difference between the hemispheres, because it will be largely wrong. It is not what each hemisphere does – they are both involved in everything – but how it does it, that matters. And the prime difference between the brain hemispheres is the manner in which they attend. For reasons of survival we need one hemisphere (in humans and many animals, the left) to pay narrow attention to detail, to grab hold of things we need, while the other, the right, keeps an eye out for everything else. The result is that one hemisphere is good at utilising the world, the other better at understanding it. Absent, present, detached, engaged, alienated, empathic, broad or narrow, sustained or piecemeal, attention has the power to alter whatever it meets. The play of attention can both create and destroy, but it never leaves its object unchanged. How you attend to something – or don’t attend to it – matters a very great deal. This book helps you to see what it is you may have been trained by our very unusual culture not to see.

The Intelligence of Place

The Intelligence of Place

Author: Jeff Malpas

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781472588692

Category: Philosophy

Page: 272

View: 948

Place has become a widespread concept in contemporary work in the humanities, creative arts, and social sciences. Yet in spite of its centrality, place remains a concept more often deployed than interrogated, and there are relatively few works that focus directly on the concept of place as such. The Intelligence of Place fills this gap, providing an exploration of place from various perspectives, encompassing anthropology, architecture, geography, media, philosophy, and the arts, and as it stands in relation to a range of other concepts. Drawing together many of the key thinkers currently writing on the topic, The Intelligence of Place offers a unique point of entry into the contemporary thinking of place – into its topographies and poetics – providing new insights into a concept crucial to understanding our world and ourselves.

The Divided Brain and the Search for Meaning

The Divided Brain and the Search for Meaning

Author: Iain McGilchrist

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300190021

Category: Psychology

Page: 40

View: 184

In this 10,000-word essay, written to complement Iain McGilchrist's acclaimed The Master and His Emissary, the author asks why - despite the vast increase in material well-being - people are less happy today than they were half a century ago, and suggests that the division between the two hemispheres of the brain has a critical effect on how we see and understand the world around us. In particular, McGilchrist suggests, the left hemisphere's obsession with reducing everything it sees to the level of minute, mechanistic detail is robbing modern society of the ability to understand and appreciate deeper human values. Accessible to readers who haven't yet read The Master and His Emissary as well as those who have, this is a fascinating, immensely thought-provoking essay that delves to the very heart of what it means to be human.

Revelation and Reconciliation

Revelation and Reconciliation

Author: Stephen Williams

Publisher: BoD – Books on Demand

ISBN: 9780227177396

Category: Philosophy

Page: 212

View: 339

This substantially revised second edition of Revelation and Reconciliation, first published by Cambridge University Press in 1995, gives a fresh account of the intellectual breakdown of Christianity in the West. In contrast to the familiar focus on epistemological questions and the collision between reason and revelation, Stephen Williams argues that underlying this collision is a deeper conflict between belief in human moral self-sufficiency and Christian belief in reconciliation in history. Taking issue with thinkers including the philosopher of science, Michael Polanyi, and the theologian, Colin Gunton, the argument proceeds by examining the contributions of Descartes, Locke, Barth and Nietzsche before coming to conclusions on the theological reading of intellectual history and the prospects of revitalising a contemporary Christian belief in reconciliation in history. Students of both theology and the history of modern thought will find in Williams’ analysis an alternative interpretation of the balance of forces in post-Reformation Western thought with implications for how they should be addressed.

From Object to Experience

From Object to Experience

Author: Harry Francis Mallgrave

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 9781350059542

Category: Architecture

Page: 256

View: 250

Harry Francis Mallgrave combines a history of ideas about architectural experience with the latest insights from the fields of neuroscience, cognitive science and evolutionary biology to make a powerful argument about the nature and future of architectural design. Today, the sciences have granted us the tools to help us understand better than ever before the precise ways in which the built environment can affect the building user's individual experience. Through an understanding of these tools, architects should be able to become better designers, prioritizing the experience of space - the emotional and aesthetic responses, and the sense of homeostatic well-being, of those who will occupy any designed environment. In From Object to Experience, Mallgrave goes further, arguing that it should also be possible to build an effective new cultural ethos for architectural practice. Drawing upon a range of humanistic and biological sources, and emphasizing the far-reaching implications of new neuroscientific discoveries and models, this book brings up-to-date insights and theoretical clarity to a position that was once considered revolutionary but is fast becoming accepted in architecture.