Search Results for: The Magic Behind The Voices A Whos Who Of Cartoon Voice Actors

Cartoon Voices of the Golden Age, 1930-70 Vol. 1

Cartoon Voices of the Golden Age, 1930-70 Vol. 1

Author: Keith Scott

Publisher: BearManor Media

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 596

View: 741

Cartoon voices of the golden age, 1930-70 In today’s world of instant information everyone knows everything about cartoon voices. Animation is a huge business, and Voice Actors are respected. But it wasn’t always so. For thirty years before the TV age, countless “Classic Era” cartoons from 1928 to 1970 were seen in movie theatres before the main feature. During that Golden Age, virtually every cartoon voice actor (with the notable exception of the great Mel Blanc), was resigned to being totally anonymous. Despite creating immortal voices like Droopy, Popeye, Elmer Fudd or Betty Boop, the actors’ names simply didn’t appear on screen. This book is the first to explore the development of voice artistry from the birth of sound movies to the dawn of TV cartoons, when “voices” finally got screen credit. Documented in this exhaustively researched history is the full story of how acting for cartoons slowly changed from squawks and grunts into an art form. From the earliest days when animators themselves were the only voices, through the gradual hiring of professional radio actors, this book finally names the many artists who were unknown for four decades. Illustrated with rare mugshots of hitherto unknown voices, Volume One is the studio-by-studio saga of how cartoon voice acting took off. Volume Two is the reference section, with insanely detailed voice credits for thousands of cartoons from top animation studios of the Classic Era. Animation fans can finally learn the full story in Cartoon Voices of the Golden Age, with never before told insights into one of the most undocumented areas of film history. Keith Scott has spent over forty years as an internationally recognized cartoon voice actor and impressionist. He narrated two George of the Jungle movies, and was the voice of both Bullwinkle J. Moose and the Narrator in The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle. He is the author of The MooseThat Roared and many articles on animation and Hollywood radio history.

Disney Voice Actors

Disney Voice Actors

Author: Thomas S. Hischak

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9780786486946

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 290

View: 855

This biographical dictionary is devoted to the actors who provided voices for all the Disney animated theatrical shorts and features from the 1928 Mickey Mouse cartoon Steamboat Willie to the 2010 feature film Tangled. More than 900 men, women, and child actors from more than 300 films are covered, with biographical information, individual career summaries, and descriptions of the animated characters they have performed. Among those listed are Adriana Caselotti, of Snow White fame; Clarence Nash, the voice of Donald Duck; Sterling Holloway, best known for his vocal portrayal of Winnie the Pooh; and such show business luminaries as Bing Crosby, Bob Newhart, George Sanders, Dinah Shore, Jennifer Tilly and James Woods. In addition, a complete directory of animated Disney films enables the reader to cross-reference the actors with their characters.

Look at Me!

Look at Me!

Author: Orville G Brim

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472026579

Category: Psychology

Page: 208

View: 748

Four million adults in the United States say that becoming famous is the most important goal in their lives. In any random sampling of one hundred American adults, two will have fame as their consuming desire. What motivates those who set fame as their priority, where did the desire come from, how does the pursuit of fame influence their lives, and how is it expressed? Based on the research of Orville Gilbert Brim, award-winning scholar in the field of child and human development, Look at Me! answers those questions. Look at Me! examines the desire to be famous in people of all ages, backgrounds, and social status and how succeeding or failing affects their lives and their personalities. It explores the implications of the pursuit of fame throughout a person's lifetime, covering the nature of the desire; fame, money, and power; the sources of fame; how people find a path to fame; the kinds of recognition sought; creating an audience; making fame last; and the resulting, often damaged, life of the fame-seeker. In our current age of celebrity fixation and reality television, Brim gives us a social-psychological perspective on the origins of this pervasive desire for fame and its effects on our lives. "Look at Me! is a fascinating in-depth study of society's obsession with fame. If you ever wondered what it's like to be famous, why fame comes to some and is sought by others, it's all here . . ." ---Jeffrey L. Bewkes, Chairman and CEO, Time Warner "In a voice filled with wisdom and insight, daring and self-reflection, Orville Brim masterfully traces the developmental origins and trajectory of fame. Look at Me! lets us see---with new eyes---the cultural priorities and obsessions that feed our individual hunger and appetites. A rare and rewarding book." ---Sara Lawrence-Lightfoot, Emily Hargroves Fisher Professor of Education at Harvard University and author of Respect and The Third Chapter Orville Gilbert Brim has had a long and distinguished career. He is the former director of the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Successful Midlife Development, former president of the Foundation for Child Development, former president of the Russell Sage Foundation, and author and coauthor of more than a dozen books about human development, intelligence, ambition, and personality. Cover image ©iStockphoto.com/susib

Drawing the Line

Drawing the Line

Author: Tom Sito

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813171487

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 440

View: 241

Some of the most beloved characters in film and television inhabit two-dimensional worlds that spring from the fertile imaginations of talented animators. The movements, characterizations, and settings in the best animated films are as vivid as any live action film, and sometimes seem more alive than life itself. In this case, Hollywood’s marketing slogans are fitting; animated stories are frequently magical, leaving memories of happy endings in young and old alike. However, the fantasy lands animators create bear little resemblance to the conditions under which these artists work. Anonymous animators routinely toiled in dark, cramped working environments for long hours and low pay, especially at the emergence of the art form early in the twentieth century. In Drawing the Line, veteran animator Tom Sito chronicles the efforts of generations of working men and women artists who have struggled to create a stable standard of living that is as secure as the worlds their characters inhabit. The former president of America’s largest animation union, Sito offers a unique insider’s account of animators’ struggles with legendary studio kingpins such as Jack Warner and Walt Disney, and their more recent battles with Michael Eisner and other Hollywood players. Based on numerous archival documents, personal interviews, and his own experiences, Sito’s history of animation unions is both carefully analytical and deeply personal. Drawing the Line stands as a vital corrective to this field of Hollywood history and is an important look at the animation industry’s past, present, and future. Like most elements of the modern commercial media system, animation is rapidly being changed by the forces of globalization and technological innovation. Yet even as pixels replace pencils and bytes replace paints, the working relationship between employer and employee essentially remains the same. In Drawing the Line, Sito challenges the next wave of animators to heed the lessons of their predecessors by organizing and acting collectively to fight against the enormous pressures of the marketplace for their class interests—and for the betterment of their art form.

Paris and the Musical

Paris and the Musical

Author: Olaf Jubin

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9780429878619

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 408

View: 935

Paris and the Musical explores how the famous city has been portrayed on stage and screen, investigates why the city has been of such importance to the genre and tracks how it has developed as a trope over the 20th and 21st centuries. From global hits An American in Paris, Gigi, Les Misérables, Moulin Rouge! and The Phantom of the Opera to the less widely-known Bless the Bride, Can-Can, Irma la Douce and Marguerite, the French capital is a central character in an astounding number of Broadway, Hollywood and West End musicals. This collection of 18 essays combines cultural studies, sociology, musicology, art and adaptation theory, and gender studies to examine the envisioning and dramatisation of Paris, and its depiction as a place of romance, hedonism and libertinism or as ‘the capital of the arts’. The interdisciplinary nature of this collection renders it as a fascinating resource for a wide range of courses; it will be especially valuable for students and scholars of Musical Theatre and those interested in Theatre and Film History more generally.

Hanna-Barbera

Hanna-Barbera

Author: Jared Bahir Browsh

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 9781476675794

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 308

View: 135

With careers spanning eight decades, William Hanna and Joseph Barbera were two of the most prolific animation producers in American history. In 1940, the two met at MGM and created Tom and Jerry, who would earn 14 Academy Award nominations and seven wins. The growth of television led to the founding of Hanna-Barbera's legendary studio that produced countless hours of cartoons, with beloved characters from Fred Flintstone, George Jetson and Scooby-Doo to the Super Friends and the Smurfs. Prime-time animated sitcoms, Saturday morning cartoons, and Cartoon Network's cable animation are some of the many areas of television revolutionized by the team. Their productions are critical to our cultural history, reflecting ideologies and trends in both media and society. This book offers a complete company history and examines its productions' influences, changing technologies, and enduring cultural legacy, with careful attention to Hanna-Barbera's problematic record of racial and gender representation.

Think Pink: The Story of DePatie-Freleng

Think Pink: The Story of DePatie-Freleng

Author: Mark Arnold

Publisher: BearManor Media

ISBN:

Category: Performing Arts

Page:

View: 585

In 1963, Warner Bros. closed down their long-running cartoon facility that had produced such memorable merrymakers as the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies cartoons. Director/producer Friz Freleng and executive David H. DePatie faced unwanted early retirement. A generous parting gesture from a Warner executive allowed Freleng and DePatie to lease the former Warner cartoons studio on California Street in Burbank, complete with equipment and supplies, for a few dollars each year. They teamed up to create animated cartoons for advertising, but not everything behind their enterprise was enchanting. They struggled to keep their small animation studio running against odds and obstacles such as rising costs, heavy competition, outsourcing of labor to other countries, strikes, death, changing directions, and buyouts. They never anticipated how they would soon style a series of cartoon characters that would paint memorable colors over movie animation history. When director Blake Edwards produced The Pink Panther starring David Niven, Peter Sellers, Robert Wagner, Capucine, and Claudia Cardinale, he envisioned a cartoon character of the same name to illustrate the opening credits sequence. Edwards hired Freleng and DePatie, together with artists at their DePatie-Freleng Enterprises studio, to design the animated sequence. The crafty magenta furry feline minced his way into moviegoer’s hearts. The inspiration behind the ink was the people that worked at the DePatie-Freleng Enterprises (DFE) animation studio. Their hilarious cartoons caused a generation of moviegoers to rock theaters with laughter. Author Mark Arnold returns you to the nostalgic memories of the exhilarating Pink Panther series and other cartoons DFE created. Discover the craftsmen behind the cartoons in an exciting exploration of the Pink Panther, Inspector Clouseau, Ant and the Aardvark, Cat in the Hat, The Grinch, The Lorax, Doctor Dolittle, Spider-Man, Spider-Woman, Mr. Magoo, The Fantastic Four, Planet of the Apes, Doctor Snuggles, Baggy Pants, The Nitwits, The Barkleys, The Houndcats, The Grump, The Super Six, Super President, Spy Shadow, Hoot Kloot, Blue Racer, Crazylegs Crane, Misterjaw, Tijuana Toads, The Dogfather, The Oddball Couple, Charlie the tuna, David DePatie, Friz Freleng, Blake Edwards, Peter Sellers, and various animators. Over 400 photos and illustrations. Indexed. Appendixes. About the author: Mark Arnold is a comic book and animation historian. He has written for various magazines, including Back Issue, Alter Ego, Hogan’s Alley, Comic Book Artist, and Comic Book Marketplace. He is the author of seven other books, including two about Harvey Comics, two about Cracked magazine, one about TTV (Underdog), one about The Beatles, and one about Disney. He also helped Craig Yoe with a book about Archie. He has also performed commentary for the Underdog, Tennessee Tuxedo, and Casper DVD sets for Shout Factory. He is currently at work on a book about Dennis the Menace. He lives in Eugene, OR.