Search Results for: The Long American Revolution And Its Legacy

The Long American Revolution and Its Legacy

The Long American Revolution and Its Legacy

Author: Lester D. Langley

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 9780820355764

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 946

"This book brings together the author's personal and professional link to the long American Revolution in a narrative that spans more than 150 years and places the Revolution in multiple contexts -- from the local to the transatlantic and hemispheric and from racial and gendered to political, social, economic, and cultural perspectives. A descendant on his father's side from a long line of Kentuckians, the author grew up torn between a father who embodied the Revolution's poor white male driven by economic self-interest and racial prejudices and a devoted and pious mother who saw life and history as a morality play. The author's intellectual and professional 'encounter' with the American Revolution came in the 1960s as a young historian specializing in U.S. foreign relations and Latin American history, an era when the U.S. encounter with the Cuban Revolution in the hemisphere and the civil rights movement at home served as reminders of the lasting and troublesome legacy of a long American Revolution. In a sweeping narrative that incorporates both the traditional, iconic literature on the Revolution and more recent works in U.S., Canadian, Latin American, Caribbean, and Atlantic world history, the author addresses fundamental questions about the Revolution's meaning and legacy"--

The Long Civil War

The Long Civil War

Author: John David Smith

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813181325

Category: History

Page: 246

View: 246

In this wide-ranging volume, eminent historians John David Smith and Raymond Arsenault assemble a distinguished group of scholars to build on the growing body of work on the "Long Civil War" and break new ground. They cover a variety of related subjects, including antebellum missionary activity and colonialism in Africa, the home front, the experiences of disabled veterans in the US Army Veteran Reserve Corps, and Dwight D. Eisenhower's personal struggles with the war's legacy amid the growing civil rights movement. The contributors offer fresh interpretations and challenging analyses of topics such as ritualistic suicide among former Confederates after the war and whitewashing in Walt Disney Studios' historical Cold War–era movies. Featuring many leading figures in the field, The Long Civil War meaningfully expands the focus of mid-nineteenth-century history as it was understood by previous generations of historians.

Inside GHQ

Inside GHQ

Author: 竹前栄治

Publisher: Burns & Oates

ISBN: UOM:39015055198397

Category: Japan

Page: 808

View: 100

Japan's success in charting a new course in the years following World War II stems from the reforming impetus of GHQ/SCAP, Headquarters of the American-led allied occupation that indirectly governed the nation for nearly seven years. This is the story of the reforms of the Occupation period and of the remarkable men and women, Japanese and American, who implemented them. Professor Takemae introduces material on the wartime origins of Occupation policies, the British Commonwealth Force, the Kurils, Okinawa the Korean minority, A-bomb survivors, war crimes, the Constitution Education, and Health and Welfare.

The Legacy of the American Revolution to the British West Indies and Bahamas

The Legacy of the American Revolution to the British West Indies and Bahamas

Author: Wilbur Henry Siebert

Publisher: Sagwan Press

ISBN: 1376746573

Category:

Page: 58

View: 155

This work has been selected by scholars as being culturally important, and is part of the knowledge base of civilization as we know it. This work was reproduced from the original artifact, and remains as true to the original work as possible. Therefore, you will see the original copyright references, library stamps (as most of these works have been housed in our most important libraries around the world), and other notations in the work. This work is in the public domain in the United States of America, and possibly other nations. Within the United States, you may freely copy and distribute this work, as no entity (individual or corporate) has a copyright on the body of the work. As a reproduction of a historical artifact, this work may contain missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. Scholars believe, and we concur, that this work is important enough to be preserved, reproduced, and made generally available to the public. We appreciate your support of the preservation process, and thank you for being an important part of keeping this knowledge alive and relevant.

One Day That Shook the Communist World

One Day That Shook the Communist World

Author: Paul Lendvai

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691132828

Category: History

Page: 297

View: 218

On October 23, 1956, a popular uprising against Soviet rule swept through Hungary like a force of nature, only to be mercilessly crushed by Soviet tanks twelve days later. This book presents an eyewitness account and an history of the uprising in Hungary that heralded the future liberation of Eastern Europe.

Baron Johann de Kalb

Baron Johann de Kalb

Author: Charles River Editors

Publisher:

ISBN: 179266043X

Category:

Page: 54

View: 173

*Includes pictures *Includes contemporary accounts *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading "So, there lies the brave de Kalb. The generous stranger, who came from a distant land to fight our battles and to water with his blood the tree of liberty. Would to God he had lived to share its fruits!" - George Washington By the time the Revolutionary War started, military confrontations between the world powers had become so common that combat was raised to the status of a fine art, consuming a large portion of time for adolescent males in training and comprising a sizeable component of the economy. Weaponry was developed to a degree of quality not accessible to most North Americans, and European aristocrats were reared in the mastery of swordsmanship with an emphasis on the saber for military use. Likewise, the cavalry, buoyed by a tradition of expert horsemanship and saddle-based combat, was a fighting force largely beyond reach for colonists, which meant that fighting on horses was an undeveloped practice in the fledgling Continental Army, and the American military did not yet fully comprehend the value of cavalry units. Few sword masters were to find their way to North America in time for the war, and the typical American musket was a fair hunting weapon rather than a military one. Even the foot soldier knew little of European military discipline. German participation is historically noted for the Hessians, mercenary soldiers recruited in whole companies by Britain, whose standing army featured relatively low numbers when the American Revolution began. However, other Germans noted for their mastery of the science of war sided with the colonies, and one of them was Baron Johann von de Kalb, a mentor and elder colleague of the legendary Marquis de Lafayette. Considered by some to be far too old for one attempting to rejuvenate the career of a soldier, de Kalb was a keen student of war with a steady mind and hand. Once able to prove his worth to the Continental Congress, he rose immediately to the rank of Brigadier General under George Washington, served with distinction, and died heroically in the Battle of Camden, a battle in the South that foretold the eventual surrender of Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown. For professionals of a European country to graft themselves to the culture of another was not so unusual in the 18th century, whether in the arts, government, or the military, but de Kalb was distinctly unique from a young age as a German with a strong Francophile bent. As a youth, he served in a German infantry division training and fighting for the French king, and after two grisly wars that left no nation in Europe untouched, he threw off his anticipated retirement and turned toward the American Revolution against Britain. By the time of his participation in the American theater, de Kalb was in his 50s, but given that he was still physically strong and well-trained in combat, he took up the fight against Britain as a matter of personal rejuvenation, on both a political and emotional level. In his efforts on behalf of the colonies, he proved himself to possess extraordinary vitality, regardless of age, and his legacy, much like that of his protége, remains a strong one. To this day, he is commemorated by numerous communities and counties across the present-day U.S. Baron Johann de Kalb: The Life and Legacy of the German Major General Who Fought in the American Revolution profiles one of the Revolutionary War's most famous soldiers. Along with pictures of important people, places, and events, you will learn about de Kalb like never before.

The Dublin Lockout, 1913

The Dublin Lockout, 1913

Author: Conor McNamara

Publisher: Merrion Press

ISBN: 9781911024828

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 612

Putting Ireland on trial, Jim Larkin’s verdict was damning and resolute. His words resound, shuddering towards the present day where class division and workers’ rights disputes make headlines with swelling frequency. In this pioneering collection, an exemplary list of contributors registers the radical momentum within Dublin in 1913, its effects internationally, and its paramount example in shaping political activism within Ireland to this day. The narrative of the beleaguered yet dignified workers who stood up to the greed of their Irish masters is examined, revealing the truths that were too fraught with trauma, shame and political tension to remain within popular memory. Beyond the animosity and immediate impact of the industrial dispute are its enduring lessons through the First World War, the Easter Rising, and the birth of the Irish Free State; its legacy, real and adopted, instructs the surge of activism currently witnessed, but to what effect? The Dublin Lockout, 1913 illuminates this pivotal class war in Irish history: inspiring, shocking, and the nearest thing Ireland had to a debate on the type of society that was wanted by its citizens.

The Legacy of the American Revolution to the British West Indies and Bahamas; a Chapter Out of the History of the American Loyalists Volume 1

The Legacy of the American Revolution to the British West Indies and Bahamas; a Chapter Out of the History of the American Loyalists Volume 1

Author: Wilbur Henry Siebert

Publisher: Theclassics.Us

ISBN: 1230375716

Category:

Page: 162

View: 663

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1913 edition. Excerpt: ... On the same day the new commander in chief held a council of war, which decided in favor of evacuating the city; and this decision seems to have been communicated to a meeting of "gentlemen, merchants, and citizens" that took place at the British Tavern. The local historian, Westcott, says that notice had been previously given that all deserters from the American army who wished to go to England would be sent, and that "many availed themselves of the privilege." Probably, the news of the intended evacuation did not come as an entire surprise to the community, for Mrs. Drinker recorded in her Journal, under date of May 23d, that preparations for the departure were being made by "many of the inhabitants." On June 3d three regiments crossed the Delaware and encamped near Cooper's Ferry and Gloucester. Two days later Captain Johann Heinrichs of the Hessian Jager Corps, who was then at the Neck near the city, wrote to his brother that "about one thousand royally inclined families" in Philadelphia were "willing to leave hearth and home and with their chattels go with the army." A few days later still the British Peace Commissioners arrived in the city; and one of them, Lord Carlisle, wrote that he found everything in confusion, "the army upon the point of leaving town, and about three thousand of the miserable inhabitants embarked on board our ships, to convey them from a place where they thought they would receive no mercy from those who will take possession after us." In a letter of June 15th to the colonial secretary in London, the Commissioners stated that they had found the greater part of those who had put themselves under the King's protection either retiring on board ships in the Delaware River, or endeavoring to effect their...