Search Results for: The Economic Intstitutions Of Capitalism

The Economic Intstitutions of Capitalism

The Economic Intstitutions of Capitalism

Author: Oliver E. Williamson

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9780684863740

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 468

View: 522

"An extraordinarily impressive achievement and must reading for all serious students of law, economics, and organization."--Paul L. Joskow, Professor of Economics, Massachusetts of Technology.

The Fundamental Institutions of Capitalism

The Fundamental Institutions of Capitalism

Author: Ernesto Screpanti

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134538683

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 320

View: 539

The Fundamental Institutions of Capitalism presents a radical institutional approach to the analysis of capitalism. Ernesto Screpanti puts forward a number of provocative arguments that expose common ground in both neoclassical and Marxist orthodoxies. It will appeal to a broad audience of social scientists including advanced students and professionals with an interest in politics and economics.

Property and Prophets: The Evolution of Economic Institutions and Ideologies

Property and Prophets: The Evolution of Economic Institutions and Ideologies

Author: E. K. Hunt

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317461982

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 292

View: 482

"Property and Prophets" is a concise history of the rise and subsequent triumph of capitalism. Focused primarily on England until 1800 and the United States since 1800, the book's economic history is interspersed with the history of ideas that evolved along with the capitalist system.

Puzzles in the Economic Institutions of Capitalism

Puzzles in the Economic Institutions of Capitalism

Author: Graham Brownlow

Publisher:

ISBN: OCLC:1290829290

Category:

Page:

View: 904

Pre-Famine Ireland is a byword for market failure and path dependence. Production of flax yarn and linen cloth was highly regulated and coordinated by the market rather than by firms. Contemporary political economists suggested that these institutional features provided evidence of organisational inefficiency. The historical evidence suggests that they were a rational response to transaction and production costs. The Irish case provides a test of the hypotheses that firms emerge to reduce the cost of market transactions. It suggests that institutions other than the firm can modify transaction costs, coordination of production can affect both transaction and production costs, and that agents choose between market and firm coordination given technology and factor prices. Finally, centralisation of production was driven by technology.