Search Results for: The Bottom Line

Beyond the Bottom Line

Beyond the Bottom Line

Author: Jack Quarter

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 1567204147

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 203

View: 106

Quarter analyzes the contribution of business people who use their business to develop and promote an idealistic social vision. He provides eleven case studies of contemporary innovators from six countries and an historical analysis of this phenomenon.

Watching the Bottom Line

Watching the Bottom Line

Author: John Whiteley

Publisher: How To Books Ltd

ISBN: 1857039890

Category: Small business

Page: 314

View: 938

Chartered accountant and small business expert Whitely shows how to manage a small business successfully through accounting techniques and how to accurately measure its achievements.

Marketing and the Bottom Line

Marketing and the Bottom Line

Author: Tim Ambler

Publisher: Pearson Education

ISBN: 0273661949

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 320

View: 895

Marketing and the bottom line sets out to change this. Based an extensive and original research involving world-beating companies such as 3M, Accenture, British Airways, Diageo and McDonald's, this book analyzes the impact that marketing has on the financial well-being of a company. Viewing marketing as a strategic board-level function, Ambler sets out a new generation of marketing metrics designed to make marketing more accountable for what it does, what it spends and what it earns.

Transforming the Bottom Line

Transforming the Bottom Line

Author: Tony Hope

Publisher: Harvard Business Press

ISBN: 0875847463

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 232

View: 260

Argues that 30 percent of a company's costs are for activities which do not benefit the customer, offering strategies for measuring and developing workflows which add value to the customer

The Bottom Line

The Bottom Line

Author: Michael J. Allen

Publisher: Delirious Scribbles Ink, Inc.

ISBN: 9781944357559

Category: Fiction

Page: 39

View: 884

Blood and death might be for sale, but Ronald Gerald isn't. Earth's economy depends taxing mercenaries. Space-age pirates in all but name, Gerald will stop at nothing to prove the mercs guilty. Hannibal’s Hammers never say die, even if they have to fight dirty. Catching criminals might be Gerald’s job, but the bullets weren’t.

The Bottom Line

The Bottom Line

Author: Pamela Parry

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 9781000154511

Category: Business & Economics

Page:

View: 211

The first step any company must take before it can begin ISO 14001 implementation is to secure 100 percent, enthusiastic commitment from top management. Top management is persuaded if ISO 14001 impacts the bottom line. This practical, how-to book helps you build a business case for ISO 14001. Implementing ISO 14001 brings a corporate culture change, resulting in cost savings, reduced waste, and enhanced relationships with community regulators and other stakeholders. The author explores these issues with top people in the field who have already implemented the system. She addresses: what steps did they take? has the business case been supported by experience? what are the tangible cost savings? Through these interviews you understand what elements or cost savings can be transferred to your company. You will learn how to convince senior management to implement ISO 14001 - and what business benefits your company will see through the eyes of experts who have been down that path. Once you have top management on board, you must deliver. The Bottom Line: How to Build a Business Case for ISO 14001 shows you how to implement ISO 14001 and how it will profitably affect your bottom line.

Above the Bottom Line

Above the Bottom Line

Author: Hanoch Teller

Publisher: Feldheim Publishers

ISBN: 0961477253

Category: Religion

Page: 413

View: 821

Stories of integrity which heighten our awareness of G-d's aversion to deception and teach us to rise above expediency.

Beyond the Bottom Line

Beyond the Bottom Line

Author: Martin W. Sandler

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195353838

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 224

View: 860

This book brings to the management of nonprofit organizations and public sector organizations the kind of concepts that have long been applied to commercial firms. Management thinking has long been concentrated on the problems of managing commercial organizations. Authors Sandler and Hudson set out to study the best managed nonprofit and government organizations and to determine what they did to achieve their success. The authors found that there is a close similarity between the management thinking of these organizations and that of profit-making firms. Each type of firm defined who their customers were and how to best serve them. They looked for ways of selling their particular product. They formed partnerships with other organizations in pursuit of their ultimate goals. They encouraged innovation among their workers. They diffused power down through the organizations to the lowest level possible. They created an atmosphere that made their workers feel valued. And they had extensive systems for communicating within and outside the organizations. The book develops these concepts in separate chapters and describes the organizations the authors study as examples. Sandler and Hudson are experienced writers who have produced a straightforward, non-technical work that analyzes the special problems and concerns that these organizations share and offers a set of effective organizing principles to improve their management.

Shakespeare, Einstein, and the Bottom Line

Shakespeare, Einstein, and the Bottom Line

Author: David L. KIRP

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674039650

Category: Education

Page: 336

View: 692

How can you turn an English department into a revenue center? How do you grade students if they are "customers" you must please? How do you keep industry from dictating a university's research agenda? What happens when the life of the mind meets the bottom line? Wry and insightful, Shakespeare, Einstein, and the Bottom Line takes us on a cross-country tour of the most powerful trend in academic life today--the rise of business values and the belief that efficiency, immediate practical usefulness, and marketplace triumph are the best measures of a university's success. With a shrewd eye for the telling example, David Kirp relates stories of marketing incursions into places as diverse as New York University's philosophy department and the University of Virginia's business school, the high-minded University of Chicago and for-profit DeVry University. He describes how universities "brand" themselves for greater appeal in the competition for top students; how academic super-stars are wooed at outsized salaries to boost an institution's visibility and prestige; how taxpayer-supported academic research gets turned into profitable patents and ideas get sold to the highest bidder; and how the liberal arts shrink under the pressure to be self-supporting. Far from doctrinaire, Kirp believes there's a place for the market--but the market must be kept in its place. While skewering Philistinism, he admires the entrepreneurial energy that has invigorated academe's dreary precincts. And finally, he issues a challenge to those who decry the ascent of market values: given the plight of higher education, what is the alternative? Table of Contents: Introduction: The New U Part I: The Higher Education Bazaar 1. This Little Student Went to Market 2. Nietzsche's Niche: The University of Chicago 3. Benjamin Rush's "Brat": Dickinson College 4. Star Wars: New York University Part II: Management 101 5. The Dead Hand of Precedent: New York Law School 6. Kafka Was an Optimist: The University of Southern California and the University of Michigan 7. Mr. Jefferson's "Private" College: Darden Graduate School of Business Administration, University of Virginia Part III: Virtual Worlds 8. Rebel Alliance: The Classics Departments of Sixteen Southern Liberal Arts Colleges 9. The Market in Ideas: Columbia University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology 10. The British Are Coming-and Going: Open University Part IV: The Smart Money 11. A Good Deal of Collaboration: The University of California, Berkeley 12. The Information Technology Gold Rush: IT Certification Courses in Silicon Valley 13. They're All Business: DeVry University Conclusion: The Corporation of Learning Notes Acknowledgments Index Reviews of this book: An illuminating view of both good and bad results in a market-driven educational system. --David Siegfried, Booklist Reviews of this book: Kirp has an eye for telling examples, and he captures the turmoil and transformation in higher education in readable style. --Karen W. Arenson, New York Times Reviews of this book: Mr. Kirp is both quite fair and a good reporter; he has a keen eye for the important ways in which bean-counting has transformed universities, making them financially responsible and also more concerned about developing lucrative specialties than preserving the liberal arts and humanities. Shakespeare, Einstein, and the Bottom Line is one of the best education books of the year, and anyone interested in higher education will find it to be superior. --Martin Morse Wooster, Washington Times Reviews of this book: There is a place for the market in higher education, Kirp believes, but only if institutions keep the market in its place...Kirp's bottom line is that the bargains universities make in pursuit of money are, inevitably, Faustian. They imperil academic freedom, the commitment to sharing knowledge, the privileging of need and merit rather than the ability to pay, and the conviction that the student/consumer is not always right. --Glenn C. Altschuler, Philadelphia Inquirer Reviews of this book: David Kirp's fine new book, Shakespeare, Einstein, and the Bottom Line, lays out dozens of ways in which the ivory tower has leaned under the gravitational influence of economic pressures and the market. --Carlos Alcal', Sacramento Bee Reviews of this book: The real subject of Kirp's well-researched and amply footnoted book turns out to be more than this volume's subtitle, 'the marketing of higher education.' It is, in fact, the American soul. Where will our nation be if instead of colleges transforming the brightest young people as they come of age, they focus instead on serving their paying customers and chasing the tastes they should be shaping? Where will we be without institutions that value truth more than money and intellectual creativity more than creative accounting? ...Kirp says plainly that the heart of the university is the common good. The more we can all reflect upon that common good--not our pocketbooks or retirement funds, but what is good for the general mass of men and women--the better the world of the American university will be, and the better the nation will be as well. --Peter S. Temes, San Francisco Chronicle Reviews of this book: David Kirp's excellent book Shakespeare, Einstein, and the Bottom Line provides a remarkable window into the financial challenges of higher education and the crosscurrents that drive institutional decision-making...Kirp explores the continuing battle for the soul of the university: the role of the marketplace in shaping higher education, the tension between revenue generation and the historic mission of the university to advance the public good...This fine book provides a cautionary note to all in higher education. While seeking as many additional revenue streams as possible, it is important that institutions have clarity of mission and values if they are going to be able to make the case for continued public support. --Lewis Collens, Chicago Tribune Reviews of this book: In this delightful book David Kirp...tells the story of markets in U.S. higher education...[It] should be read by anyone who aspires to run a university, faculty or department. --Terence Kealey, Times Higher Education Supplement The monastery is colliding with the market. American colleges and universities are in a fiercely competitive race for dollars and prestige. The result may have less to do with academic excellence than with clever branding and salesmanship. David Kirp offers a compelling account of what's happening to higher education, and what it means for the future. --Robert B. Reich, University Professor, Brandeis University, and former U.S. Secretary of Labor Can universities keep their purpose, independence, and public trust when forced to prove themselves cost-effective? In this shrewd and readable book, David Kirp explores what happens when the pursuit of truth becomes entwined with the pursuit of money. Kirp finds bright spots in unexpected places--for instance, the emerging for-profit higher education sector--and he describes how some traditional institutions balance their financial needs with their academic missions. Full of good stories and swift character sketches, Shakespeare, Einstein, and the Bottom Line is engrossing for anyone who cares about higher education. --Laura D'Andrea Tyson, former Chair, Council of Economic Advisers David Kirp wryly observes that "maintaining communities of scholars is not a concern of the market." His account of the state of higher education today makes it appallingly clear that the conditions necessary for the flourishing of both scholarship and community are disappearing before our eyes. One would like to think of this as a wake-up call, but the hour may already be too late. --Stanley Fish, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, the University of Illinois at Chicago This is, quite simply, the most deeply informed and best written recent book on the dilemma of undergraduate education in the United States. David Kirp is almost alone in stressing what relentless commercialization of higher education does to undergraduates. At the same time, he identifies places where administrators and faculty have managed to make the market work for, not against, real education. If only college and university presidents could be made to read this book! --Stanley N. Katz, Center for Arts and Cultural Policy Studies, Princeton University Once a generation a book brilliantly gives meaning to seemingly disorderly trends in higher education. David Kirp's Shakespeare, Einstein, and the Bottom Line is that book for our time [the early 21st century?]. With passion and eloquence, Kirp describes the decline of higher education as a public good, the loss of university governing authority to constituent groups and external funding sources, the two-edged sword of collaboration with the private sector, and the rise of business values in the academy. This is a must read for all who care about the future of our universities. --Mark G. Yudof, Chancellor, The University of Texas System David Kirp not only has a clear theoretical grasp of the economic forces that have been transforming American universities, he can write about them without putting the reader to sleep, in lively, richly detailed case studies. This is a rare book. --Robert H. Frank, Johnson Graduate School of Management, Cornell University David Kirp wanders America's campuses, and he wonders--are markets, management and technology supplanting vision, values and truth? With a large dose of nostalgia and a penchant for academic personalities, he ponders the struggles and synergies of Ivy and Internet, of industry and independence. Wandering and wondering with him, readers will feel the speed of change in contemporary higher education. --Charles M. Vest, President, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

The Bottom Line or Public Health

The Bottom Line or Public Health

Author: William H. Wiist

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199704929

Category: Medical

Page: 592

View: 490

When corporations claim the same citizenship rights as human citizens, they exercise an undue influence on health policy and democratic processes. Surprisingly, the same basic repertoire of tactics has been found to be employed by corporations to effect this influence, regardless of the specific industry at work. In this book, authors from around the world reveal the range of tactics used across the corporate world that ultimately favor the bottom line over the greater good. The Bottom Line or Public Health deconstructs some of the most ubiquitous tactics at play, including public relations, political influence, legal maneuvering, and financial power, using the pharmaceutical, food and agriculture, tobacco, alcohol, and motor vehicle industries as illustration. However, there is a growing global movement to counter this corporate force. The book discusses the role of non-governmental organizations, indigenous peoples' groups, health advocates, and social justice activists, and the ways in which they are working to reduce corporate power and put control of policy back in the hands of individuals. The Bottom Line or Public Health is for scholars interested in studying the corporate entity, and for individuals and organizations who want to reclaim democracy for human citizens so that health is placed above the bottom line.