Search Results for: Stories From The Leopold Shack

Stories from the Leopold Shack

Stories from the Leopold Shack

Author: Estella B. Leopold

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190463236

Category: Nature

Page: 256

View: 677

In 1934, conservationist Aldo Leopold and his wife Estella bought a barn - the remnant of a farm - and surrounding lands in south-central Wisconsin. The entire Leopold clan - five children in all - worked together to put into practice Aldo's "land ethic," which involved ecological restoration and sustainability. In the process, they built more than a pleasant weekend getaway; they established a new way of relating to nature. In 1948, A Sand County Almanac was published, and it has become a beloved and foundational text of the conservation movement. Decades later, Estella B. Leopold, the youngest of the Leopold children - she was eight when they bought the land - now reflects on the "Shack," as they called the repurposed barn, and its inhabitants, and recalls with clear-eyed fondness the part it played in her and her siblings' burgeoning awareness of nature's miracles, season by season. In Stories from the Leopold Shack: Sand County Revisited, she unforgettably recalls the intensity of those days: the taste of fresh honey on sourdough pancakes; the trumpeting arrival of migrating Canada geese; the awesome power of river ice driven by currents - and each description is accompanied by stunning photographs by her brother, A. Carl Leopold. As the Leopolds worked to restore degraded farmland back to its original prairie and woods, they noted and celebrated all of the flora and fauna that came to share the Shack lands. As first evoked in A Sand County Almanac, and now revisited in Stories from the Leopold Shack, the Leopold family's efforts of ecological restoration were among the earliest in the United States, and their work, collectively and individually, continues to have a profound impact on land management and conservationism. All of Aldo and Estella Leopold's children went on to become distinguished scientists and to devote themselves to a life of conservation; their work continues through the Aldo Leopold Foundation. Estella B. Leopold book offers a voyage back to the place where it all began.

Stories from the Leopold Shack

Stories from the Leopold Shack

Author: Estella B. Leopold

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190463229

Category: Nature

Page: 344

View: 109

Estella Leopold, the daughter of revered American ecologist, conservationist and writer Aldo Leopold, whose A Sand County Almanac is an enduring American classic, takes us inside the place where ""land ethic"" theory started.

Leopold's Shack and Ricketts's Lab

Leopold's Shack and Ricketts's Lab

Author: Michael J. Lannoo

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520264786

Category: Nature

Page: 229

View: 605

"Leopold's Shack and Ricketts's Lab brings fresh insight to the fertile ideas and writings of two innovators of early twentieth century ecology. In this insightful and important book, Michael J. Lannoo enriches the legacies of Leopold and Ricketts as early conservation-minded environmentalists and suggests that there is still much to be learned from them."--Katharine A. Rodger, editor of Breaking Through: Essays, Journals, and Travelogues of Edward F. Ricketts "Lannoo creatively explores an important story of compelling historical characters with a clear vision of their significance for today's readers."--Curt Meine, author of Aldo Leopold: His Life and Work

Ecological Restoration and the U.S. Nature and Environmental Writing Tradition

Ecological Restoration and the U.S. Nature and Environmental Writing Tradition

Author: Laura Smith

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030861483

Category: Social Science

Page: 348

View: 676

This book presents a critical history of the intersections between American environmental literature and ecological restoration policy and practice. Through a storying—restorying—restoring framework, this book explores how entanglements between writers and places have produced literary interventions in restoration politics. The book considers the ways literary landscapes are politicized by writers themselves, and by conservationists, activists, policymakers, and others, in defense of U.S. public lands and the idea of wilderness. The book profiles five environmental writers and examines how their writings on nature, wildness, wilderness, conservation, preservation, and restoration have variously inspired and been translated into ecological restoration programs and campaigns by environmental organizations. The featured authors are Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862) at Walden Pond, John Muir (1838–1914) in Yosemite National Park, Aldo Leopold (1887–1948) at his family’s Wisconsin sand farm, Marjory Stoneman Douglas (1890–1998) in the Everglades, and Edward Abbey (1927–1989) in Glen Canyon. This book combines environmental history, literature, biography, philosophy, and politics in a commentary on considering (and developing) environmental literature’s place in conversations on restoration ecology, ecological restoration, and rewilding.

Beloved Beasts: Fighting for Life in an Age of Extinction

Beloved Beasts: Fighting for Life in an Age of Extinction

Author: Michelle Nijhuis

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 9781324001690

Category: Science

Page: 352

View: 571

Winner of the Sierra Club's 2021 Rachel Carson Award One of Chicago Tribune's Ten Best Books of 2021 Named a Top Ten Best Science Book of 2021 by Booklist and Smithsonian Magazine "At once thoughtful and thought-provoking,” Beloved Beasts tells the story of the modern conservation movement through the lives and ideas of the people who built it, making “a crucial addition to the literature of our troubled time" (Elizabeth Kolbert, author of The Sixth Extinction). In the late nineteenth century, humans came at long last to a devastating realization: their rapidly industrializing and globalizing societies were driving scores of animal species to extinction. In Beloved Beasts, acclaimed science journalist Michelle Nijhuis traces the history of the movement to protect and conserve other forms of life. From early battles to save charismatic species such as the American bison and bald eagle to today’s global effort to defend life on a larger scale, Nijhuis’s “spirited and engaging” account documents “the changes of heart that changed history” (Dan Cryer, Boston Globe). With “urgency, passion, and wit” (Michael Berry, Christian Science Monitor), she describes the vital role of scientists and activists such as Aldo Leopold and Rachel Carson, reveals the origins of vital organizations like the Audubon Society and the World Wildlife Fund, explores current efforts to protect species such as the whooping crane and the black rhinoceros, and confronts the darker side of modern conservation, long shadowed by racism and colonialism. As the destruction of other species continues and the effects of climate change wreak havoc on our world, Beloved Beasts charts the ways conservation is becoming a movement for the protection of all species including our own.

Masculinity and Place in American Literature since 1950

Masculinity and Place in American Literature since 1950

Author: Vidya Ravi

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781498587334

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 172

View: 972

This volume explores the relationship in postwar American literature between masculinity and place, tracing the development of the 'domesticated man' of midcentury and the continual subversion of this established vision of masculinity by alternate systems of symbols and ecological consciousness.

Sky Dance of the Woodcock

Sky Dance of the Woodcock

Author: Greg Hoch

Publisher: Bureau Oak Book

ISBN: 9781609386276

Category: Nature

Page: 193

View: 571

Woodcock are one of the oddest birds in North America. They are a shorebird that got lost and ended up in the scrubby parts of the forest, and look like they were put together with the leftover parts of other birds. Oddities aside, each spring they rise to great beauty with their sky dance at dusk. Greg Hoch combines natural history, land management, scientific knowledge, and personal observation to examine this little game bird. Woodcock have a complex life history and the management of their habitat is also complex. The health of this bird can be considered a key indicator of what good forests look like.

What Kind of Ancestor Do You Want to Be?

What Kind of Ancestor Do You Want to Be?

Author: John Hausdoerffer

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226777573

Category: Nature

Page: 248

View: 304

As we face an ever-more-fragmented world, What Kind of Ancestor Do You Want to Be? demands a return to the force of lineage—to spiritual, social, and ecological connections across time. It sparks a myriad of ageless-yet-urgent questions: How will I be remembered? What traditions do I want to continue? What cycles do I want to break? What new systems do I want to initiate for those yet-to-be-born? How do we endure? Published in association with the Center for Humans and Nature and interweaving essays, interviews, and poetry, this book brings together a thoughtful community of Indigenous and other voices—including Linda Hogan, Wendell Berry, Winona LaDuke, Vandana Shiva, Robin Kimmerer, and Wes Jackson—to explore what we want to give to our descendants. It is an offering to teachers who have come before and to those who will follow, a tool for healing our relationships with ourselves, with each other, and with our most powerful ancestors—the lands and waters that give and sustain all life.

Saving Tarboo Creek

Saving Tarboo Creek

Author: Scott Freeman

Publisher: Hachette UK

ISBN: 9781604698381

Category: Nature

Page: 292

View: 796

Examine the most pressing environmental issues of our time through one family’s detailed account of creek restoration. Equal parts heartfelt and enlightening, Saving Tarboo Creek explores how the Freeman family lived a more authentic, fulfilling, and natural life one sapling and one acre at a time.

Friends of the Earth

Friends of the Earth

Author: Pat McCarthy

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

ISBN: 9781569769751

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 144

View: 837

The history of American environmentalism is the history of men and women who dedicated their lives to protecting the nation's natural heritage. Almost singlehandedly, John James Audubon introduced the study of birds in North America. John Muir pushed a president and a nation into setting aside vast preserves, including Yosemite, Sequoia, Mt. Rainier, and the Grand Canyon. Marjory Stoneman Douglas did the same for the Florida Everglades, as did Mardy Murie with the Grand Tetons and the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Cordelia Stanwood, and later Roger Peterson, revolutionized and popularized birdwatching. Rachel Carson opened the world's eyes to the dangers of pesticides, and Julia &“Butterfly&” Hill saved a 1,000-year-old redwood while bringing to light the devastation of our old growth forests. Together, these environmentalists' inspiring life stories tell the story of American environmentalism, from its inception to the present day. In Friends of Our Earth readers will also learn how to put their concerns into action. Author Pat McCarthy gives step-by-step instructions on how to build a birdfeeder, conduct a water quality survey, start a compost pile, study the Greenhouse Effect, make plaster casts of animals tracks, create their own recycled paper, test for acid rain, and more. It includes a time line of historic milestones, popular outdoor parks and sites to visit or explore online, and Web resources for further study.

Living a Land Ethic

Living a Land Ethic

Author: Stephen A. Laubach

Publisher: University of Wisconsin Pres

ISBN: 9780299298746

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 155

View: 201

A significant and important story about how a small group of landowners, inspired by Aldo Leopold, pioneered private conservation and ecological restoration. It offers an insightful reflection on what it means to live the 'land ethic' that is quite relevant to today's growing conservation challenges.--Tia Nelson

Steinbeck’s Imaginarium

Steinbeck’s Imaginarium

Author: Robert DeMott

Publisher: University of New Mexico Press

ISBN: 9780826364296

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 137

View: 868

In Steinbeck’s Imaginarium, Robert DeMott delves into the imaginative, creative, and sometimes neglected aspects of John Steinbeck’s writing. DeMott positions Steinbeck as a prophetic voice for today as much as he was for the Depression-era 1930s as the essays explore the often unknown or unacknowledged elements of Steinbeck’s artistic career that deserve closer attention. He writes about the determining scientific influences, such as quantum physics and ecology, in Cannery Row and considers Steinbeck’s addiction to writing through the lens of the extensive, obsessive full-length journals that he kept while writing three of his best-known novels—The Grapes of Wrath, The Wayward Bus, and East of Eden. DeMott insists that these monumental works of fiction all comprise important statements on his creative process and his theory of fiction writing. DeMott further blends his personal experience as a lifelong angler with a reading of several neglected fishing episodes in Steinbeck’s work. Collectively, the chapters illuminate John Steinbeck as a fully conscious, self-aware, literate, experimental novelist whose talents will continue to warrant study and admiration for years to come.