Search Results for: Reversing The Cult Of Speed In Higher Education

Reversing the Cult of Speed in Higher Education

Reversing the Cult of Speed in Higher Education

Author: Jonathan Chambers

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351625371

Category: Education

Page: 262

View: 781

A collection of essays written by arts and humanities scholars across disciplines, this book argues that higher education has been compromised by its uncritical acceptance of our culture’s standards of productivity, busyness, and speed. Inspired by the Slow Movement, contributors explain how and why university culture has come to value productivity over contemplation and rapidity over slowness. Chapter authors argue that the arts and humanities offer a cogent critique of fast culture in higher education, and reframe the discussion of the value of their fields by emphasizing the dialectic between speed and slowness.

Music, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Music, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Author: Jacqueline Warwick

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781000648461

Category: Social Science

Page: 140

View: 904

Music, Gender, and Sexuality Studies: A Teacher’s Guide serves as a guide to the professor tasked with teaching music to undergraduates, with a focus on gender. Although the notion of feminist approaches in musicology was once greeted with scorn, the last 40 years have seen a seismic shift across music studies, to the point that classes on women and music are now commonplace in most undergraduate music program. The goal of this book is to give the instructor some tools and strategies that will build confidence in approaching music as it relates to gender and sexuality, and to offer some advice on how to make the class rewarding for all. The book is organized into four broad sections, plus an introduction outlining how to use the book and how the teaching of music, gender, and sexuality can be rewarding. Each section – Composition, Support, Performance, and Audience – includes possible themes for study and examples of music that can illuminate those themes, allowing the instructor to shape the course according to their own preference for classical, jazz, or popular styles. The author offers a practical guide to building syllabi that can fit the instructor’s interests and the priorities of the institution, crafting assignments that will engage and inspire students, choosing repertoire from a range of styles and genres, and maintaining a focus on how music shapes gender, and how gender shapes music.

Slow Ethics and the Art of Care

Slow Ethics and the Art of Care

Author: Ann Gallagher

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing

ISBN: 9781839091971

Category: Health & Fitness

Page: 216

View: 441

The path to good care-giving can be challenging, particularly where practices are characterised by crisis, moral panic and cultural complexity. How can we respond ethically when there is pressure to meet targets, work faster and implement quick, short-term fixes? This book offers a solution in the form of slow ethics.

Teaching Critical Performance Theory

Teaching Critical Performance Theory

Author: Jeanmarie Higgins

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000045222

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 246

View: 314

Teaching Critical Performance Theory offers teaching strategies for professors and artist-scholars across performance, design and technology, and theatre studies disciplines. The book’s seventeen chapters collectively ask: What use is theory to an emerging theatre artist or scholar? Which theories should be taught, and to whom? How can theory pedagogies shape and respond to the evolving needs of the academy, the field, and the community? This broad field of enquiry is divided into four sections covering course design, classroom teaching, the studio space, and applied theatre contexts. Through a range of intriguing case studies that encourage thoughtful theatre practice, this book explores themes surrounding situated learning, dramaturgy and technology, disability and inclusivity, feminist approaches, race and performance, ethics, and critical theory in theatre history. Written as an invaluable resource for professionals and postgraduates engaged in performance theory, this collection of informative essays will also provide critical reading for those interested in drama and theatre studies more broadly.

Teaching Performance Practices in Remote and Hybrid Spaces

Teaching Performance Practices in Remote and Hybrid Spaces

Author: Jeanmarie Higgins

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781000599299

Category: Education

Page: 230

View: 381

This collection of insightful essays gives teachers’ perspectives on the role of space and presence in teaching performance. It explores how the demand for remote teaching can be met while at the same time successfully educating and working compassionately in this most ‘live’ of disciplines. Teaching Performance Practices in Remote and Hybrid Spaces reframes prevailing ideas about pedagogy in dance, theatre, and somatics and applies them to teaching in face-to-face, hybrid, and remote situations. Case studies from instructors and professors provide essential, practical suggestions for remotely teaching a vast range of studio courses, including tap dance, theatre design, movement, script analysis, and acting, rendering this book an invaluable resource. The challenges that teachers are facing in the early twenty-first century are addressed throughout, helping readers to navigate these unprecedented circumstances whilst delivering lessons, guiding workshops, rehearsing, or even staging performances. This book is invaluable for dance and theatre teachers or leaders who work in the performing arts and related disciplines. It is also ideal for any professionals who need research-based solutions for teaching performance online.

Historians' Virtues

Historians' Virtues

Author: Herman Paul

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781108999144

Category: History

Page: 118

View: 611

Why do historians so often talk about objectivity, empathy, and fair-mindedness? What roles do such personal qualities play in historical studies? And why does it make sense to call them virtues rather than skills or habits? Historians' Virtues is the first publication to explore these questions in some depth. With case studies from across the centuries, the Element identifies major discontinuities in how and why historians talked about the marks of a good scholar. At the same time, it draws attention to long-term legacies that last until today. Virtues were, and are, invoked in debates over the historian's task. They reveal how historians position themselves vis-à-vis political regimes, religious traditions, or neoliberal university systems. More importantly, they show that historical study not only requires knowledge and technical skills, but also makes demands on the character of its practitioners. This title is also available as Open Access on Cambridge Core.

Inquiring into Academic Timescapes

Inquiring into Academic Timescapes

Author: Filip Vostal

Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing

ISBN: 9781789739138

Category: Education

Page: 312

View: 882

There is a pervasive sense of incessant acceleration in the academic world. This book puts the temporal ordering of academic life under the microscope, and showcases the means of yielding a better understanding of how time and temporality act both as instruments of power and vulnerability within the academic space.