Search Results for: Georges Perecs Geographies

Georges Perec’s Geographies

Georges Perec’s Geographies

Author: Charles Forsdick

Publisher: UCL Press

ISBN: 9781787354425

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 276

View: 952

Georges Perec, novelist, filmmaker and essayist, was one of the most inventive and original writers of the twentieth century. A fascinating aspect of his work is its intrinsically geographical nature. With major projects on space and place, Perec’s writing speaks to a variety of geographical, urban and architectural concerns, both in a substantive way, including a focus on cities, streets, homes and apartments, and in a methodological way, experimenting with methods of urban exploration and observation, classification, enumeration and taxonomy. Georges Perec’s Geographies is the first book to offer a rounded picture of Perec’s geographical interests. Divided into two parts, Part I, Perec’s Geographies, explores the geographies within Perec’s work in film, literature and radio, from descriptions of streets to the spaces of his texts, while Part II, Perecquian Geographies, explores geographies in a range of material and metaphorical forms, including photographic essays, soundscapes, theatre, dance and writing, created by those directly inspired by Perec. Georges Perec’s Geographies extends the body of Perec criticism beyond Literary and French Studies to disciplines including Geography, Urban Studies, Planning and Architecture to offer a complete and systematic examination of Georges Perec’s geographies. The diversity of readings and approaches will be of interest not only to Perec readers and fans but to students and researchers across these subjects.

Discursive Geographies / Géographies discursives

Discursive Geographies / Géographies discursives

Author:

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004501379

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 285

View: 847

The present collection of essays follows in the wake of recent work in cultural geography challenging the idea that maps are scientifically neutral entities, or that space, unlike time, is immobile. In defining space, place and geography as forms of textuality, the essays collected in this volume examine the ways in which postcolonial and metropolitan literary and filmic texts in French can at once inscribe and produce place and space, and thereby participate in forms of “discursive geographies.” Contributors: François Bon; Alexandre Dauge-Roth; Habiba Deming; Zakaria Fatih; Jeanne Garane; Patricia Geesey; Greg Hainge; Sirène Harb; Jean-Luc Joly; Chantal Kalisa; Michel Laronde; Valérie Loichot; Mary McCullough; Michael O’Riley; Pascale Perraudin; Walter Putnam; Antoine Stéphani; Abdourahman A. Waberi.

Cultural Geographies

Cultural Geographies

Author: John Horton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781317753681

Category: Science

Page: 342

View: 823

Cultural geography is a major, vibrant subdiscipline of human geography. Cultural geographers have done some of the most important, exciting and thought-provokingly zesty work in human geography over the last half-century. This book exists to provide an introduction to the remarkably diverse, controversial, and sometimes-infuriating work of cultural geographers. The book outlines how cultural geography in its various forms provides a rich body of research about cultural practices and politics in diverse contexts. Cultural geography offers a major resource for exploring the importance of cultural materials, media, texts and representations in particular contexts and is one of the most theoretically adventurous subdisciplines within human geography, engaging with many important lines of social and cultural theory. The book has been designed to provide an accessible, wide-ranging and thought-provoking introduction for students studying cultural geography, or specific topics within this subdiscipline. Through a wide range of case studies and learning activities, it provides an engaging introduction to cultural geography.

Creative Writing for Social Research

Creative Writing for Social Research

Author: Phillips, Richard

Publisher: Policy Press

ISBN: 9781447355977

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 487

This groundbreaking book brings creative writing to social research. Its innovative format includes creatively written contributions by researchers from a range of disciplines, modelling the techniques outlined by the authors. The book is user-friendly and shows readers: • how to write creatively as a social researcher; • how creative writing can help researchers to work with participants and generate data; • how researchers can use creative writing to analyse data and communicate findings. Inviting beginners and more experienced researchers to explore new ways of writing, this book introduces readers to creatively written research in a variety of formats including plays and poems, videos and comics. It not only gives social researchers permission to write creatively but also shows them how to do so.

Ordinary Cities, Extraordinary Geographies

Ordinary Cities, Extraordinary Geographies

Author: Bryson, John R.

Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing

ISBN: 9781789908022

Category: Political Science

Page: 264

View: 760

This insightful book explores smaller towns and cities, places in which the majority of people live, highlighting that these more ordinary places have extraordinary geographies. It focuses on the development of an alternative approach to urban studies and theory that foregrounds smaller cities and towns rather than much larger cities and conurbations.

Envisioning Human Geographies

Envisioning Human Geographies

Author: Paul Cloke

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781134664931

Category: Science

Page: 337

View: 653

Bringing together many of the leading human geographers from around the English-speaking world, Envisioning Human Geographies offers a series of personal visions for the future of human geography. The result is a vigorous and far-sighted debate about what human geography could and should be concerned with in the twenty-first century. The individual contributors develop their arguments to address the shape and direction of human geographies, with each chapter looking forward and envisioning an intellectual future for the subject. The result is a set of powerful statements written around the themes of: ·space ·nature ·enclosure ·political-economy ·non-representation ·post-colonialism ·feminism ·post-structuralism ·computation ·morality ·spirituality ·activism. The statements are tied via an introduction that discusses the ideological, academic and aesthetic prompts that fire the human geographical imagination. Envisioning Human Geographies maps out important new territories of enquiry for human geography, and is essential reading for all students studying the nature and philosophy of the subject.

Cultural Memory and Popular Dance

Cultural Memory and Popular Dance

Author: Clare Parfitt

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030710835

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 306

View: 787

This book focuses on the myriad ways that people collectively remember or forget shared pasts through popular dance. In dance classes, nightclubs, family celebrations, tourist performances, on television, film, music video and the internet, cultural memories are shared and transformed by dancing bodies adapting yesterday’s steps to today’s concerns. The book gathers emerging and seasoned scholarly voices from a wide range of geographical and disciplinary perspectives to discuss cultural remembering and forgetting in diverse popular dance contexts. The contributors ask: how are Afro-diasporic memories invoked in popular dance classes? How are popular dance genealogies manipulated and reclaimed? What is at stake for the nation in the nationalizing of folk and popular dances? And how does mediated dancing transmit memory as feelings or affects? The book reveals popular dance to be vital to cultural processes of remembering and forgetting, allowing participants to pivot between alternative pasts, presents and futures.

An Introduction to Population Geographies

An Introduction to Population Geographies

Author: Holly R. Barcus

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135146009

Category: Social Science

Page: 398

View: 871

An Introduction to Population Geographies provides a foundation to the incredibly diverse, topical and interesting field of twenty-first-century population geography. It establishes the substantive concerns of the subdiscipline, acknowledges the sheer diversity of its approaches, key concepts and theories and engages with the resulting major areas of academic debate that stem from this richness. Written in an accessible style and assuming little prior knowledge of topics covered, yet drawing on a wide range of diverse academic literature, the book’s particular originality comes from its extended definition of population geography that locates it firmly within the multiple geographies of the life course. Consequently, issues such as childhood and adulthood, family dynamics, ageing, everyday mobilities, morbidity and differential ability assume a prominent place alongside the classic population geography triumvirate of births, migrations and deaths. This broader framing of the field allows the book to address more holistically aspects of lives across space often provided little attention in current textbooks. Particular note is given to how these lives are shaped though hybrid social, biological and individual arenas of differential life course experience. By engaging with traditional quantitative perspectives and newer qualitative insights, the authors engage students from the quantitative macro scale of population to the micro individual scale. Aimed at higher-level undergraduate and graduate students, this introductory text provides a well-developed pedagogy, including case studies that illustrate theory, concepts and issues.

Life as Creative Constraint

Life as Creative Constraint

Author: Anna Kemp

Publisher: Liverpool University Press

ISBN: 9781800345508

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 219

View: 210

Life as Creative Constraint is the first book to focus on the extraordinary life-writing of the French experimental writing group, the Oulipo. The Oulipo's enthusiasm for literary games and formal gymnastics has seen its work caricatured as 'lifeless' - impressively virtuoso but more interested in form than content and ultimately disengaged from the world. This book examines a broad corpus of work by Georges Perec, Marcel Bénabou, Jacques Roubaud and Anne F. Garréta to show that, despite the group's early devotion to the radical impersonality of mathematics, later generations of oulipians have brought the group's fascination with systems, games and constraints to bear on autobiography. Far from being 'lifeless', oulipian constraints and concepts provide the tools that allow writers to engage critically and creatively with lived experience, and mine the potential of the autobiographical genre. The games played by these writers are not simply pastimes or cunning writing techniques, but modes of survival, self-examination, self-invention, and relating to the world and to others. As the title of Georges Perec’s masterpiece suggests, they are a mode d’emploi for life.

Fieldwork for Human Geography

Fieldwork for Human Geography

Author: Richard Phillips

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 9781446268971

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 467

"A highly readable and superbly fun guide to the why and how of doing fieldwork in human geography... I recommend it highly to any geographer-wannabes and practicing-geographers. The latter group, including myself, might well rediscover the fun of doing geography." - Professor Henry Yeung, National University of Singapore "An excellent introduction to the art and science of fieldwork. It makes clear that fieldwork is not just about getting out of the classroom and gaining first-hand experience of places, it is about instilling passion about those places." - Professor Stuart C. Aitken, San Diego State University "An indispensible guide to fieldwork that will enrich the practice of geography in a myriad of different ways. In particular, the diverse materials presented here will encourage students and academics alike to pursue new approaches to their work and instil a greater understanding of the conceptual and methodological breadth of their discipline." - Professor Matthew Gandy, University College London "If fieldwork is an indispensable component of geographical education then this book is equally essential to making the most of fieldwork...This book gives students the tools to realise the full potential of what, for many, is the highlight of their geography degree." - Professor Noel Castree, Manchester University Fieldwork is a core component of Human Geography degree courses. In this lively and engaging book, Richard Phillips and Jennifer Johns provide a practical guide to help every student get the most out of their fieldwork. This book: Encourages students to engage with fieldwork critically and imaginatively Explains methods and contexts Links the fieldwork with wider academic topics. It looks beyond the contents of research projects and field visits to address the broader experiences of fieldwork: working in groups, understanding your ethical position, developing skills for learning and employment and opening your eyes, ears and minds to the wider possibilities of your trip. Throughout the book, the authors present first person descriptions of field experiences and predicaments, written by fieldtrip leaders and students from around the world including the UK, Canada, Singapore, Australia and Africa.

Literature and Geography

Literature and Geography

Author: Emmanuelle Peraldo

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443887601

Category: Science

Page: 490

View: 705

In a period marked by the Spatial Turn, time is not the main category of analysis any longer. Space is. It is now considered as a central metaphor and topos in literature, and literary criticism has seized space as a new tool. Similarly, literature turns out to be an ideal field for geography. This book examines the cross-fertilization of geography and literature as disciplines, languages and methodologies. In the past two decades, several methods of analysis focusing on the relationship and interconnectedness between literature and geography have flourished. Literary cartography, literary geography and geocriticism (Westphal, 2007, and Tally, 2011) have their specificities, but they all agree upon the omnipresence of space, place and mapping at the core of analysis. Other approaches like ecocriticism (Buell, 2001, and Garrard, 2004), geopoetics (White, 1994), geography of literature (Moretti, 2000), studies of the inserted map (Ljunberg, 2012, and Pristnall and Cooper, 2011) and narrative cartography have likewise drawn attention to space. Literature and Geography: The Writing of Space Throughout History, following an international conference in Lyon bringing together literary academics, geographers, cartographers and architects in order to discuss literature and geography as two practices of space, shows that literature, along with geography, is perfectly valid to account for space. Suggestions are offered here from all disciplines on how to take into account representations and discourses since texts, including literary ones, have become increasingly present in the analysis of geographers.