Search Results for: Forgiveness

Forgiveness

Forgiveness

Author: Julia Frazier White

Publisher: Xlibris Corporation

ISBN: 1456843117

Category: Self-Help

Page: 155

View: 834

Forgiveness: Learning How to Forgive by Julia Frazier White is a book for people who have been deeply hurt and caught in a vortex of anger, depression, and resentment. Julia White shares how forgiveness can reduce anxiety and depression while increasing self esteem and hopefulness toward ones future. This fresh new work demonstrates how forgiveness, approached in the correct manner, benefits the forgiver far more than the forgiven. Filled with wisdom and warm encouragement, the book leads the reader on a path that will bring clarity and peace. The act of forgiving is itself an exercise in restoring oneself to wholeness. When a heinous act is committed, sometimes one wonders if forgiveness is even possible. In this ground-breaking book, Dr. White gives us the seven steps that are taken in the forgiveness process. When we forgive, she says, we set a prisoner free and discover that the prisoner we set free is us. In an easy-to-read yet astute analysis of the meaning and value of forgiveness, Dr. White teaches the reader that forgiveness is a way of healing. She takes as her model sound biblical principles and outlines the many subtleties involved in forgiveness, such as distinguishing anger from hate, and noting that we only forgive those we blame (including ourselves). Forgetting may be more difficult, but at least Forgiveness: Learning How to Forgive can help us along the path toward release and healing.

Forgiveness

Forgiveness

Author: Iyanla Vanzant

Publisher: Hay House, Inc

ISBN: 9781401943806

Category: Self-Help

Page: 256

View: 189

Too many of us feel trapped in stagnant romantic, family, or workplace relationships. Weighed down by toxic thoughts and emotions, we might be quick to judge and slow to pardon, and self-righteous about our feelings as we dwell on memories of what we or others did (or failed to do). In this new book, Iyanla Vanzant challenges us to liberate ourselves from the wounds of the past and to embrace the new power of forgiveness. With Iyanla’s 21-Day Forgiveness Plan, you’ll explore relationship dynamics with your parents, children, friends, partners, co-workers, bosses, yourself, and even God. With journaling work and Emotional Freedom Techniques (also known as "tapping"), you’ll learn to live with more love; gain new clarity on your life, lessons, and blessings; and discover a new level of personal freedom, peace, and well-being. Forgiveness doesn’t mean agreeing with, condoning, or even liking what has happened. Forgiveness means letting go and knowing that—regardless of how challenging, frightening, or difficult an experience may seem—everything is just as it needs to be in order for you to grow and learn. When you focus on how things "should" be, you deny the presence and power of love. Accept the events of the past, while being willing to change your perspective on them. As Iyanla says, "Only forgiveness can liberate minds and hearts once held captive by anger, bitterness, resentment, and fear. Forgiveness is a true path to freedom that can renew faith, build trust, and nourish the soul."

Forgiveness and Atonement

Forgiveness and Atonement

Author: Jonathan Curtis Rutledge

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000556117

Category: Religion

Page: 232

View: 745

This book analyzes the relationship between forgiveness, atonement, and reconciliation from a Christian theological perspective. Drawing on both theological and philosophical literature, it addresses the problem of whether atonement is required for forgiveness and considers important related concepts such as sin and justice. The author develops a sacrificial model of atonement that connects an understanding of Christian forgiveness with the biblical narrative of Christ’s sacrifice and makes reconciliation between God and humanity possible. Offering a fresh and coherent argument, the book will be relevant to scholars of Christian theology, biblical studies, and the philosophy of religion.

The Philosophy of Forgiveness: Volume III

The Philosophy of Forgiveness: Volume III

Author: Gregory L. Bock

Publisher: Vernon Press

ISBN: 9781622735532

Category: Philosophy

Page: 216

View: 595

'The Philosophy of Forgiveness, Volume III: Forgiveness in World Religions' is a collection of essays that explores the philosophy of forgiveness in different religions, including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism and Confucianism. Each chapter scours one of these religions for insights on the concept of forgiveness, asking questions such as whether forgiveness is a virtue, whether it is conditional, whether God has standing to forgive, and whether it is permissible not to forgive some extreme wrongs. In some of the chapters, the concept of forgiveness in one religion is compared with that in another. In other chapters, the ideas of different traditions within a religion are compared and contrasted. Also, some chapters compare a religious concept to the views of a philosophical figure, such as Aristotle, Kant, or Derrida. The contributors to the volume come from various cultural and religious backgrounds and from different disciplines, such as philosophy, religious studies, and psychology. The collection is written for scholars, graduate students, and upper-division undergraduate students interested in forgiveness or comparative religious philosophy.

Handbook of Forgiveness

Handbook of Forgiveness

Author: Everett L. Worthington, Jr.

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351123327

Category: Psychology

Page: 372

View: 398

The Handbook of Forgiveness, Second Edition consolidates research from a wide range of disciplines and offers an in-depth review of the science of forgiveness. This new edition considers forgiveness in a diverse range of contexts and presents a research agenda for future directions in the field. Chapters approach forgiveness from a variety of perspectives, drawing on related work in areas including biology, personality, social psychology, clinical/counseling psychology, developmental psychology, philosophy, and neuroscience, as well as considering international and political implications. The Handbook provides comprehensive treatment of the topic, integrating theoretical considerations, methodological discussions, and practical intervention strategies that will appeal to researchers, clinicians, and practitioners. Reflecting the increased precision with which forgiveness has been understood, theorized, and assessed during the last 14 years of research, this updated edition of the Handbook of Forgiveness remains the authoritative resource on the field of forgiveness.

Ancient Forgiveness

Ancient Forgiveness

Author: Charles L. Griswold

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521119481

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 370

In this book, eminent scholars of classical antiquity and ancient and medieval Judaism and Christianity explore the nature and place of forgiveness in the pre-modern Western world. They discuss whether the concept of forgiveness, as it is often understood today, was absent, or at all events more restricted in scope than has been commonly supposed, and what related ideas (such as clemency or reconciliation) may have taken the place of forgiveness. An introductory chapter reviews the conceptual territory of forgiveness and illuminates the potential breadth of the idea, enumerating the important questions a theory of the subject should explore. The following chapters examine forgiveness in the contexts of classical Greece and Rome; the Hebrew Bible, the Talmud, and Moses Maimonides; and the New Testament, the Church Fathers, and Thomas Aquinas.

Atonement and Forgiveness

Atonement and Forgiveness

Author: Roy L. Brooks

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 9780520239418

Category: History

Page: 325

View: 751

A comprehensive discussion of the history of the black reparations movement offers a plan for repairing the damaged relationship between the federal government and black Americans.

Anger and Forgiveness

Anger and Forgiveness

Author: Martha C. Nussbaum

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199335893

Category: Philosophy

Page: 208

View: 897

Anger is not just ubiquitous, it is also popular. Many people think it is impossible to care sufficiently for justice without anger at injustice. Many believe that it is impossible for individuals to vindicate their own self-respect or to move beyond an injury without anger. To not feel anger in those cases would be considered suspect. Is this how we should think about anger, or is anger above all a disease, deforming both the personal and the political? In this wide-ranging book, Martha C. Nussbaum, one of our leading public intellectuals, argues that anger is conceptually confused and normatively pernicious. It assumes that the suffering of the wrongdoer restores the thing that was damaged, and it betrays an all-too-lively interest in relative status and humiliation. Studying anger in intimate relationships, casual daily interactions, the workplace, the criminal justice system, and movements for social transformation, Nussbaum shows that anger's core ideas are both infantile and harmful. Is forgiveness the best way of transcending anger? Nussbaum examines different conceptions of this much-sentimentalized notion, both in the Jewish and Christian traditions and in secular morality. Some forms of forgiveness are ethically promising, she claims, but others are subtle allies of retribution: those that exact a performance of contrition and abasement as a condition of waiving angry feelings. In general, she argues, a spirit of generosity (combined, in some cases, with a reliance on impartial welfare-oriented legal institutions) is the best way to respond to injury. Applied to the personal and the political realms, Nussbaum's profoundly insightful and erudite view of anger and forgiveness puts both in a startling new light.

The Ethics of Forgiveness

The Ethics of Forgiveness

Author: Christel Fricke

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136823138

Category: Philosophy

Page: 212

View: 983

We are often pressed to forgive or in need of forgiveness: Wrongdoing is common. Even after a perpetrator has been taken to court and punished, forgiveness still has a role to play. How should a victim and a perpetrator relate to each other outside the courtroom, and how should others relate to them? Communicating about forgiveness is particularly urgent in cases of civil war and crimes against humanity inside a community where, if there were no forgiveness, the community would fall apart. Forgiveness is governed by social and, in particular, by moral norms. Do those who ask to be forgiven have to fulfil certain conditions for being granted forgiveness? And what does the granting of forgiveness consist in? We may feel like refusing to forgive those perpetrators who have committed the most horrendous crimes. But is such a refusal justified even if they repent their crimes? Could there be a duty for the victim to forgive? Can forgiveness be granted by a third party? Under which conditions may we forgive ourselves? The papers collected in the present volume address all these questions, exploring the practice of forgiveness and its normative constraints. Topics include the ancient Chinese and the Christian traditions of forgiveness, the impact of forgiveness on the moral dignity and self-respect of the victim, self-forgiveness, the narrative of forgiveness as well as the limits of forgiveness. Such limits may arise from the personal, historical, or political conditions of wrongdoing or from the emotional constraints of the victims.