Search Results for: Chemistry In The Garden

Chemistry in the Garden

Chemistry in the Garden

Author: James R Hanson

Publisher: Royal Society of Chemistry

ISBN: 9781782625988

Category: Science

Page:

View: 359

The aim of this book is to describe some aspects of the chemistry and chemical ecology which are found in the garden. In the garden there are numerous interactions between plants, the soil and with other organisms in which chemistry plays a central mediating role. The discussion concerns several of the chemically and ecologically interesting compounds that are produced by common ornamental garden plants and vegetables and by the predators that attack them. Many chemists are amateur gardeners and this book is directed at them as well as those with a general interest in the scientific processes involved in the garden.

Chemistry in the Kitchen Garden

Chemistry in the Kitchen Garden

Author: James R Hanson

Publisher: Royal Society of Chemistry

ISBN: 9781782625834

Category: Gardening

Page:

View: 506

Over the past decade there has been a resurgence of interest in growing fruit and vegetables in the garden and on the allotment. Part of the driving force behind this is an increased awareness of the health benefits that can be derived from fruit and vegetables in the diet. The 'five helpings a day' dictum reflects the correlation between a regular consumption of fruit and vegetables and a reduced incidence of, for example, cardiovascular disease and some cancers. Growing your own vegetables provides the opportunity to harvest them at their peak, to minimize the time for post-harvest deterioration prior to consumption and to reduce their 'food miles'. It also provides an opportunity to grow interesting and less common cultivars. The combination of economic advantages and recreational factors add to the pleasure of growing fruit and vegetables. This book covers the natural products that have been identified in common 'home-grown' fruit and vegetables and which contribute to their organoleptic and beneficial properties. Over the last fifty years the immense advances in separation methods and spectroscopic techniques for structure elucidation have led to the identification of a wide range of natural products in fruit and vegetables. Not only have many of their beneficial properties been recognized but also their ecological roles in the development of plants have been identified. The functional role of many of these natural products is to mediate the balance between an organism and its environment in terms of microbial, herbivore or plant to plant interactions. The book is aimed at readers with a chemical background who wish to know a little more about the natural products that they are eating, their beneficial effects, and the roles that these compounds have in nature. Developments in the understanding of the ecological and beneficial chemistry of fruit and vegetables have made the exploration of their chemical diversity a fascinating and expanding area of natural product chemistry and readers will obtain some 'taste' for this chemistry from the book. It develops in more detail the relevant sections from the earlier RSC book 'Chemistry in the Garden'. The book begins with an outline of the major groups of compound that are found in fruit and vegetables. This is followed by a description of aspects of environmental chemistry that contribute to the successful cultivation of these crops. Subsequent chapters deal with individual plants which are grouped in terms of the part of the plant, roots, bulbs and stems, leaves, seeds, that are used for food. The final chapters deal with fruit and herbs. The epilogue considers some general aspects of ecological chemistry and climatic stress which may, in the future, affect the growth of fruit and vegetables in the garden particularly in the context of potential climate changes. The book concludes with a section on further reading, a glossary of terms used in plant chemistry and a list of the common fruit and vegetables grouped in their plant families.

A Course of Practical Work in the Chemistry of the Garden, for Teachers and Students of Horticulture Gardening and Rural Science

A Course of Practical Work in the Chemistry of the Garden, for Teachers and Students of Horticulture Gardening and Rural Science

Author: Douglas Rous Edwardes-Ker

Publisher: Hardpress Publishing

ISBN: 1407714937

Category:

Page: 50

View: 381

Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.

Tropical Food: Chemistry and Nutrition

Tropical Food: Chemistry and Nutrition

Author: George Inglett

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 9780323143103

Category: Cooking

Page: 712

View: 604

Tropical Foods: Chemistry and Nutrition, Volume 2 contains the proceedings of an International Conference on Tropical Foods: Chemistry and Nutrition, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, on March 28-30, 1979. The papers explore the chemical and nutritional aspects of tropical foods from around the world, including vegetables, coconut foods, wheat, and soybean foods. This volume is comprised of 19 chapters and begins with an overview of the nutritional aspects of some tropical plant foods by focusing on nutrition, the nutritional composition of some plant foods, and the applications and limitations of food composition tables, along with assessment of nutritional status and some obstacles to nutritional health. The next chapter surveys tropical foods in the Far East, with emphasis on the processing and nutritional evaluation of fermented foods as well as fermentation and other methods of food preservation. Vegetable production in tropical Asian countries such as the Philippines is also considered. Subsequent chapters look at tropical home gardens as a nutrition intervention, tropical foods in Central America, and some aspects of traditional African foods. This book should be a valuable resource for biochemists, nutritionists, and nutritional scientists.