Search Results for: Chehalis Stories

Chehalis Stories

Chehalis Stories

Author: Jolynn Amrine Goertz

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 9781496204110

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 366

View: 938

Published through the Recovering Languages and Literacies of the Americas initiative, supported by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation In Chehalis Stories Jolynn Amrine Goertz and the Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation in Western Washington have assembled a collaborative volume of traditional stories collected by the anthropologist Franz Boas from tribal knowledge keepers in the early twentieth century. Both Boas and Amrine Goertz worked with past and present elders, including Robert Choke, Marion Davis, Peter Heck, Blanche Pete Dawson, and Jonas Secena, in collecting and contextualizing traditional knowledge of the Chehalis people. The elders shared stories with Boas at a critical juncture in Chehalis history, when assimilation efforts during the 1920s affected almost every aspect of Chehalis life. These are stories of transformation, going away, and coming back. The interwoven adventures of tricksters and transformers in Coast Salish narratives recall the time when people and animals lived together in the Chehalis River Valley. Catastrophic floods, stolen children, and heroic rescues poignantly evoke the resiliency of the people who have carried these stories for generations. Working with contemporary Chehalis people, Amrine Goertz has extensively reviewed the work of anthropologists in western Washington. This important collection examines the methodologies, shortcomings, and limitations of anthropologists' relationship with Chehalis people and presents complementary approaches to field work and its contextualization.

Journal of Northwest Anthropology

Journal of Northwest Anthropology

Author: Darby C. Stapp

Publisher: Northwest Anthropology

ISBN: 9781729504284

Category: Social Science

Page: 226

View: 541

Fertility of First-Generation Japanese Immigrant Women in Seattle: The Influence of Ken Affiliation, Residential Location, and Employment Status by Akiko Nosaka and Donna Lockwood Leonetti Seasonal Sociopolitical Reversals and the Reinforcement of Autonomy and Fluidity among the Coast Salish by Emily Helmer Seeing the Forest for the Trees: A Spatial Database to Enhance Potential of Legacy Collections at the Washington State University Museum of Anthropology by William J. Damitio, Andrew Gillreath-Brown, and Shannon Tushingham Coast Salish Sweep ~ Tripling Chehalis Stories by Jay Miller The Hunting of Marine Animals and Fishing among the Natives of the Northwest Coast of America by Alphonse Louis Pinart, Translated by Richard L. Bland Abstracts from the 70th Annual Northwest Anthropological Conference, Spokane, WA, 13–15 April 2017

Salish Myths and Legends

Salish Myths and Legends

Author: M. Terry Thompson

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803217641

Category: Social Science

Page: 445

View: 461

The rich storytelling traditions of Salish-speaking peoples in the Pacific Northwest of North America are showcased in this anthology of story, legend, song, and oratory. From the Bitterroot Mountains to the Pacific Ocean, Salish-speaking communities such as the Bella Coola, Shuswap, Tillamook, Quinault, Colville-Okanagan, Coeur d'Alene, and Flathead have always been guided and inspired by the stories of previous generations. Many of the most influential and powerful of those tales appear in this volume.øSalish Myths and Legends features an array of Trickster stories centered on Coyote, Mink, and other memorable characters, as well as stories of the frightening Basket Ogress, accounts of otherworldly journeys, classic epic cycles such as South Wind?s Journeys and the Bluejay Cycle, tales of such legendary animals as Beaver and Lady Louse from the beginning of time, and stories that explain why things are the way they are. The anthology also includes humorous traditional tales, speeches, and fascinating stories of encounters with whites, including ?Circling Raven and the Jesuits.?øøTranslated by leading scholars working in close collaboration with Salish storytellers, these stories are certain to entertain and provoke, vividly testifying to the enduring power of storytelling in Native communities.

Recovering the Word

Recovering the Word

Author: Brian Swann

Publisher: Univ of California Press

ISBN: 0520057902

Category: American literature

Page: 644

View: 443

These essays by linguists, folklorists, anthropologists, literary theorists, and poets, bring to a new level of sophistication the structural analysis of Native American literary expression. Their common concern is for the appreciation and elucidation of Native American song and story, and for a historical, philosophical, psychoanalytic, and linguistic kind of commentary. The essays address the overlapping issues of presentation and interpretation of Native American literature: How to present in writing an art that is primarily oral, dramatic, and performative? How to interpret that art, both in its traditional forms and in its later, written forms. ISBN 0-520-05790-2: $60.00.

Handbook of Native American Literature

Handbook of Native American Literature

Author: Andrew Wiget

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135639174

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 616

View: 940

The Handbook of Native American Literature is a unique, comprehensive, and authoritative guide to the oral and written literatures of Native Americans. It lays the perfect foundation for understanding the works of Native American writers. Divided into three major sections, Native American Oral Literatures, The Historical Emergence of Native American Writing, and A Native American Renaissance: 1967 to the Present, it includes 22 lengthy essays, written by scholars of the Association for the Study of American Indian Literatures. The book features reports on the oral traditions of various tribes and topics such as the relation of the Bible, dreams, oratory, humor, autobiography, and federal land policies to Native American literature. Eight additional essays cover teaching Native American literature, new fiction, new theater, and other important topics, and there are bio-critical essays on more than 40 writers ranging from William Apes (who in the early 19th century denounced white society's treatment of his people) to contemporary poet Ray Young Bear. Packed with information that was once scattered and scarce, the Handbook of Native American Literature -a valuable one-volume resource-is sure to appeal to everyone interested in Native American history, culture, and literature. Previously published in cloth as The Dictionary of Native American Literature

Weird Washington

Weird Washington

Author: Jeff Davis

Publisher: Sterling Publishing Company, Inc.

ISBN: 9781402745454

Category: Reference

Page: 253

View: 830

Each fun and intriguing volume offers more than 250 illustrated pages of places where tourists usually don't venture. These unique travel guides are chock-full of information about oddball curiosities, ghostly places, local legends, and peculiar roadside attractions.

Be of Good Mind

Be of Good Mind

Author: Bruce Granville Miller

Publisher: UBC Press

ISBN: 9780774840897

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

View: 865

In this book, anthropologists, archaeologists, historians, linguists, and Aboriginal leaders focus on how Coast Salish lives and identities have been influenced by the two colonizing nations (Canada and the US) and by shifting Aboriginal circumstances. Contributors point to the continual reshaping of Coast Salish identities and our understandings of them through litigation and language revitalization, as well as community efforts to reclaim their connections with the environment. They point to significant continuity of networks of kinfolk, spiritual practices, and understandings of landscape. This is the first book-length effort to directly incorporate Aboriginal perspectives and a broad interdisciplinary approach to research about the Coast Salish.

The Story of Lynx

The Story of Lynx

Author: Claude Lévi-Strauss

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226474720

Category: Social Science

Page: 298

View: 336

"In olden days, in a village peopled by animal creatures, lived Wild Cat (another name for Lynx). He was old and mangy, and he was constantly scratching himself with his cane. From time to time, a young girl who lived in the same cabin would grab the cane, also to scratch herself. In vain Wild Cat kept trying to talk her out of it. One day the young lady found herself pregnant; she gave birth to a boy. Coyote, another inhabitant of the village, became indignant. He talked all of the population into going to live elsewhere and abandoning the old Wild Cat, his wife, and their child to their fate . . . " So begins the Nez Percé myth that lies at the heart of The Story of Lynx, Claude Lévi-Strauss's most accessible examination of the rich mythology of American Indians. In this wide-ranging work, the master of structural anthropology considers the many variations in a story that occurs in both North and South America, but especially among the Salish-speaking peoples of the Northwest Coast. He also shows how centuries of contact with Europeans have altered the tales. Lévi-Strauss focuses on the opposition between Wild Cat and Coyote to explore the meaning and uses of gemellarity, or twinness, in Native American culture. The concept of dual organization that these tales exemplify is one of non-equivalence: everything has an opposite or other, with which it coexists in unstable tension. In contrast, Lévi-Strauss argues, European notions of twinness—as in the myth of Castor and Pollux—stress the essential sameness of the twins. This fundamental cultural difference lay behind the fatal clash of European and Native American peoples. The Story of Lynx addresses and clarifies all the major issues that have occupied Lévi-Strauss for decades, and is the only one of his books in which he explicitly connects history and structuralism. The result is a work that will appeal to those interested in American Indian mythology.

Journal of Northwest Anthropology

Journal of Northwest Anthropology

Author: Roderick Sprague

Publisher: Northwest Anthropology

ISBN:

Category: Social Science

Page: 123

View: 998

Balanophagy in the Pacific Northwest: The Acorn-Leaching Pits at the Sunken Village Wetsite and Comparative Ethnographic Acorn Use - Bethany Mathews A Window on the Past: Pane Glass at the Beatty Cave Archaeological Site, South-Central Oregon - Thomas J. Connolly, Mark E. Swisher, Christopher L. Ruiz, and Elizabeth A. Kallenback Backing into Disaster: Lessons in Cultural Resource Management from the “Graving Dock” at Port Angeles, Washington - Thomas F. King Tylor’s Forgotten Legacy Elwyn C. Lapoint Synopsis, Synthesis, Skimping, and Scholarship: A Case Example from Chehalis in the “Other” Washington - Jay Miller A Jesuit View of Indian Affairs in Nineteenth-Century Western North America: A Translated Letter from Fr. Etienne de Rouge - Deward E. Walker, Jr. Abstracts of the 62nd Annual Meeting of the Northwest Anthropological Conference, Newport, Oregon 9–11 April 2009

Ten Traditional Tellers

Ten Traditional Tellers

Author: Margaret Read MacDonald

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252072970

Category: Social Science

Page: 213

View: 243

Examining storytelling through the distinct voices of ten traditional tellers, this text offers a look at their lives and art as they discuss their reasons for telling, their uses of the stories, and the influence of their cultural heritage.