Search Results for: Battle Of Berlin

The Greatest Battles in History

The Greatest Battles in History

Author: Charles River Charles River Editors

Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform

ISBN: 1985448149

Category:

Page: 90

View: 641

*Includes historic pictures of the fighting. *Includes accounts of the fighting written by common soldiers and important generals. *Includes pictures of important people, places, and events. *Includes a bibliography for further reading. "We were across the Saar River in Dellingen, where the Battle of the Bulge started. That was where Axis Sally told us about the Bulge. The Germans had a loud speaker back in the woods and she was talking on that. They played a few American records first. I don't remember everything she said. She said, 'Your wives and girlfriends are probably home in a nice warm building, dancing with some other men. You're over here in the cold.'" - Dent Wheeler After the successful amphibious invasion on D-Day in June 1944, the Allies began racing east toward Germany and liberating France along the way. The Allies had landed along a 50 mile stretch of French coast, and despite suffering 8,000 casualties on D-Day, over 100,000 still began the march across the western portion of the continent. By the end of August 1944, the German Army in France was shattered, with 200,000 killed or wounded and a further 200,000 captured. However, Adolf Hitler reacted to the news of invasion with glee, figuring it would give the Germans a chance to destroy the Allied armies that had water to their backs. As he put it, "The news couldn't be better. We have them where we can destroy them." While that sounds delusional in retrospect, it was Hitler's belief that by splitting the Allied march across Europe in their drive toward Germany, he could cause the collapse of the enemy armies and cut off their supply lines. Part of Hitler's confidence came as a result of underestimating American resolve, but with the Soviets racing toward Berlin from the east, this final offensive would truly be the last gasp of the German war machine, and the month long campaign was fought over a large area of the Ardenne Forest, through France, Belgium and parts of Luxembourg. From an Allied point of view, the operations were commonly referred to as the Ardennes Offensive, while the German code phrase for the operation was Unternehmen Wacht am Rhein ("Operation Watch on the Rhine"), with the initial breakout going under the name of "Operation Mist." Today, Americans know it best as the Battle of the Bulge. Regardless of the term for it, and despite how desperate the Germans were, the Battle of the Bulge was a massive attack against primarily American forces that inflicted an estimated 100,000 American casualties, the worst American losses in any battle of the war, However, while the German forces did succeed in bending, and at some points even breaking through Allied lines (thus causing the "bulge" reflected in the moniker), the Germans ultimately failed. As Winston Churchill himself said of the battle, "This is undoubtedly the greatest American battle of the war, and will, I believe be regarded as an ever famous American victory." After resisting the German attack, the Allied armies began advancing, and with that, the race to Berlin was truly on, with the Allied armies in Western Europe desperate to reach the German capital before Stalin's Soviets could arrive from the east. Less than 2 months after the Battle of the Bulge ended, Allied armies entered Germany, and by early May, Hitler would be dead in his bunker and the war in Europe would be over. The Greatest Battles in History: The Battle of the Bulge comprehensively covers the entire military situation that led up to the battle, analyzes the decisions made by the battle's most important leaders, and explains the aftermath of the Allied victory. Along with a bibliography and pictures of important people and places, you will learn about the Bulge like you never have before, in no time at all.

Race for the Reichstag

Race for the Reichstag

Author: Tony Le Tissier

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781473817418

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 218

Tony Le Tissiers classic account of the battle for Berlin dispels the myths created by Soviet propaganda and describes in graphic detail the Red Armys final offensive against Nazi Germany the race for the Reichstag. Among the soldiers of the Red Army, Berlin and the Reichstag in particular - was seen as the victor's prize. Stalin had promised Berlin to Marshal Zhukov, but the latter's blundering in the preliminary battle forced a dramatic change of plan. Stalin chastened his subordinates, then allowed Marshal Koniev, Zhukov's rival, to launch one of his powerful tank armies at the city. The advancing Soviet forces were confronted by a desperate, inadequate German defence. General Weidling's panzer corps was dragged into the city in a futile attempt to prolong the existence of the Third Reich, whose leaders squabbled and schemed in their underground shelters, a world apart from the reality outside where their subjects suffered and died. Ten days later, after the suicides of Hitler and Goebbels, the survivors had to choose between breakout and surrender.Race for the Reichstag offers a compelling insight into the terrible final days of the Second World War in Europe.During many years working in senior official positions in Berlin Tony Le Tissier accumulated a vast knowledge of the campaign the led up to the fall of the city in 1945. He has researched every aspect of the battle in unprecedented detail and has published a series of outstanding books on the subject - The Battle of Berlin 1945, Farewell to Spandau, Berlin Then and Now, Zhukov at the Oder, Slaughter at Halbe, Berlin Battlefield Guide: Third Reich and Cold War and The Siege of Kstrin 1945: Gateway to Berlin.

The Berlin 1945 Battlefield Guide

The Berlin 1945 Battlefield Guide

Author: David McCormack

Publisher: Fonthill Media

ISBN:

Category: History

Page: 160

View: 966

This highly detailed, absorbing battlefield guide is the ideal companion for anyone considering visiting the site of Hitler's `Gotterdammerung' in April-May 1945. Using his in depth knowledge as a historian and battlefield guide, David McCormack vividly describes the apocalyptic struggle played out amongst the ruins of a once great city. The author's intimate knowledge of the ground ensures that the Wagnerian climax of the Third Reich is presented in a series of dramatic tableaux which capture the regime's final convulsive death throes. Prepare for a fascinating journey across the Berlin battlefield as it is today. The Berlin 1945 Battlefield Guide: Part Two-The Battle of Berlin-is the essential guide to understanding both Hitler's downfall in Berlin and Stalin's greatest triumph.

Great Battles of World War Two - Battle of Berlin

Great Battles of World War Two - Battle of Berlin

Author:

Publisher: Scribbles

ISBN: 9352979354

Category:

Page: 112

View: 530

The Battle of Berlin, designated the Berlin Strategic Offensive Operation by the Soviet Union, and also known as the Fall of Berlin, was the final major offensive of the European theatre of World War II. Following the Vistula-Oder Offensive of January-February 1945, the Red Army had temporarily halted on a line 60 km (37 mi) east of Berlin. On 9 March, Germany established its defence plan for the city with Operation Clausewitz. The first defensive preparations at the outskirts of Berlin were made on 20 March, under the newly appointed commander of Army Group Vistula, General Gotthard Heinrici. When the Soviet offensive resumed on 16 April, two Soviet fronts (army groups) attacked Berlin from the east and south, while a third overran German forces positioned north of Berlin. Before the main battle in Berlin commenced, the Red Army encircled the city after successful battles of the Seelow Heights and Halbe. On 20 April 1945, Hitler's birthday, the 1st Belorussian Front led by Marshal Georgy Zhukov, advancing from the east and north, started shelling Berlin's city centre, while Marshal Ivan Konev's 1st Ukrainian Front broke through Army Group Centre and advanced towards the southern suburbs of Berlin. On 23 April General Helmuth Weidling assumed command of the forces within Berlin. The garrison consisted of several depleted and disorganised Wehrmacht and Waffen-SS divisions, along with poorly trained Volkssturm and Hitler Youth members. Over the course of the next week, the Red Army gradually took the entire city. Before the battle was over, Hitler and several of his followers killed themselves. The city's garrison surrendered on 2 May but fighting continued to the north-west, west, and south-west of the city until the end of the war in Europe on 8 May (9 May in the Soviet Union) as some German units fought westward so that they could surrender to the Western Allies rather than to the Soviets. This book is a compilation of high quality articles from the Internet.

Berlin: Story Of A Battle

Berlin: Story Of A Battle

Author: Andrew Tully

Publisher: Pickle Partners Publishing

ISBN: 9781787200074

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 950

At the end of World War II, Andrew Tully was one of three Americans allowed to enter Berlin as a guest of a Russian artillery battalion commander. He spent the next seventeen years gathering eyewitness accounts, collecting war diaries and letters, and reading over one hundred books in order to write this gripping and comprehensive account about the fall of Berlin. Originally published in the U.S. in 1963, Berlin: Story of a Battle has also been translated into French, Dutch, Italian and Japanese.

Soviet Conquest

Soviet Conquest

Author: Tony Le Tissier

Publisher: Pen and Sword

ISBN: 9781473821101

Category: History

Page: 217

View: 844

How did top Red Army commanders see the assault on Berlin in 1945 _ what was their experience of the last, terrible battle of the Second World War in Europe? Personal accounts by the most famous generals involved _ Zhukov, Koniev and Chuikov _ have been published in English, but the recollections of their principal subordinates haven't been available in the west before, and it is their role in the final Soviet offensive that is the focus of Tony Le Tissier's fascinating book. These were the officers who were responsible for the execution of the Red Army's plan for the assault, in immediate touch with the troops on the front line of the advance. They saw most clearly where the operation succeeded and where it failed. Their recollections, publication of which was long banned in the Soviet Union, throw a new light on the course of battle and on the inner workings of the Red Army command in the final phase of the conflict.

Battle of Berlin

Battle of Berlin

Author: Martin W Bowman

Publisher: Air World

ISBN: 9781526786418

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 553

The Battle of Berlin, the bombing of the ‘Big City’ as it was known to the crews of RAF Bomber Command, raged from 18 November 1943 to the end of the war in Europe in 1945. It is recalled here both by those in the air over capital of the Third Reich, as well as those who suffered under the bombing onslaught. At the start of the Battle of Berlin, Sir Arthur Harris had predicted that the ‘Big City’ would ‘cost between 400-500 aircraft’, but that it would also ‘cost Germany the war’. He was proved wrong on both counts. Berlin was not ‘wrecked from end to end’, as Harris predicted on 3 November 1943 – ‘if the USAAF will come in on it’ – although a considerable part of it was destroyed. And the ‘Main Battle of Berlin’ did not cost Germany the war; a grinding land campaign had yet to be fought. More than 9,000 bombing sorties were flown during the battle on round trips of about 1,200 miles to Berlin and back. Berlin was bombed by four Allied air forces between 1940 and 1945. British bombers alone dropped 45,517 tons of bombs, whilst the Americans a further 23,000 tons. By 1944, some 1.2 million people, 790,000 of them women and children, about a quarter of Berlin’s population, had been evacuated to rural areas. An effort was made to evacuate all children from Berlin, but this was defeated by parents and many evacuees who soon made their way back to the city. However, by May 1945, 1.7 million people – 40% of the population – had fled the city. This fitting tribute to those who died in the relentless struggle to knock Berlin, and hopefully Germany, out of the war resonates with eyewitness accounts and background information which the author has painstakingly investigated and researched. The result is a hugely fascinating and highly readable narrative containing very real and unique observations by British and Commonwealth aircrew and, equally importantly, the long-suffering citizens of Berlin, and well as the capital’s defenders. Up to the end of March 1945, there had been a total of 314 air raids on Berlin, eighty-five of these in the last twelve months. Estimates of the total number of dead in Berlin from air raids range from 20,000 to 50,000; the relatively low casualty figure in Berlin is partly the result of the city’s formidable air defenses and shelters. The Battle of Berlin was not a defeat in absolute terms, but in the operational sense it was an offensive that Air Marshal Sir Arthur Harris and his aircrews could not win. ‘Berlin won’ concluded Sir Ralph Cochrane, the Air Officer Commanding 5 Group RAF Bomber Command. ‘It was just too tough a nut.’

The Battle of Berlin 1945

The Battle of Berlin 1945

Author: Tony Le Tissier

Publisher: The History Press

ISBN: 9780752496573

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 528

The Battle of Berlin was a conflict of unprecedented scale. The Soviets massed 1,600,000 troops for Operation Berlin, and but Marshal Zhukov's his initial attack floundered and was so costly that he had to revise his plans for taking of the city when Stalin allowed his rival, Marshal Koniev, to intervene. The fight for Berlin thus became a contest for the prize of the Reichstag, fought in the sea of rubble left by Allied aerial bombardments, now reduced further by the mass of Soviet siege artillery. Meanwhile, Hitler and his courtiers sought to continue the struggle in the totally unrealistic atmosphere that prevailed in his bunker, while soldiers and civilians alike suffered and perished unheeded all around them.

The Siege of Küstrin

The Siege of Küstrin

Author: Tony Le Tissier

Publisher: Stackpole Books

ISBN: 9780811708296

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 750

A dramatic account of a violent Eastern Front battle in the final months of World War II is based on personal recollections by military and civilian witnesses and offers insight into how German soldiers of all ages tenaciously defended the town. Reprint.

Race for the Reichstag

Race for the Reichstag

Author: Tony, Le Tissier MBE

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136324635

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 289

The soldiers of the Red Army identified the Reichstag as the victor's prize to be taken in Berlin. This account of the battle lays the many myths created by Soviet propaganda after the event to rest and details what exactly happened as the Red Army and the Allies raced to be the first at the Reichstag.

Year Zero: Berlin 1945

Year Zero: Berlin 1945

Author: David McCormack

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 9780244092092

Category: History

Page: 172

View: 789

Year Zero vividly describes the apocalyptic downfall of the Nazi state in Berlin and the subsequent quadripartite occupation of the shattered capital by the Allied powers. This is a powerful story of victims, bystanders, persecutors, opportunists, heroes and villains. Meticulously researched and rich in historical detail, Year Zero draws on searing eyewitness accounts and archive material to provide a gripping narrative of the Wagnerian climax in Hitler's capital and the dramatic political, social, cultural and economic changes which occurred in the city during its first year under occupation. The author David McCormack works as a battlefield guide and historian. Previous publications include As the Cherry Blossom Falls: Japan at War 1931-45 and The Berlin Battlefield Guide: Part 1 - The Battle of the Oder-Neisse.