Search Results for: Archetype Architecture And The Writer

Archetype, Architecture, and the Writer

Archetype, Architecture, and the Writer

Author: Bettina L. Knapp

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 0253308577

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 236

View: 566

"Altogether, the work is a delight, offering an unusual, provocative view on the disparate texts, with the added pleasure of lucid graceful prose." —Journal of Modern Literature Bettina Knapp probes the nature, meaning, and use of the architectural metaphors and archetypes that pervade all literature.

New Perspectives on Safavid Iran

New Perspectives on Safavid Iran

Author: Colin P. Mitchell

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136991936

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 993

Dedicated to the renowned Safavid historian Roger Savory, this book brings together a collection of studies on the Safavid state of Iran (1501-1722) from the perspectives of political, social, literary, and artistic history. Savory, a doyen of Safavid studies in the 1960s and 1970s, was responsible for expanding and popularizing the study of Iran in the 16th and 17th century. To celebrate this legacy, well-established scholars of medieval and early modern Iran have contributed specific studies reflecting an array of research interests and specializations, which include critical re-examinations of issues of gender, literature, art and architecture, cultural and linguistic currents, illustrated historical chronicles, and courtly and administrative practices under the Safavid dynasty. This unique compilation is indicative of a growing interest in Iran and Iranian studies in both the academic and public spheres, and as such contains a number of new perspectives which will serve to supplement and re-interpret the existing corpus of Safavid scholarly literature to date. It will be an important text for scholars of world history and Middle East studies, as well as to historians in general.

Art and Architecture for Congregational Worship

Art and Architecture for Congregational Worship

Author: Richard S. Vosko

Publisher: Liturgical Press

ISBN: 9780814684955

Category: Architecture

Page: 252

View: 230

A deep strain of tribal politics is dividing societies around the globe. Organized religions are also coping with scandals, disappointments, and polarizing ideologies. The history of Christianity reveals that such frictions deeply wound the church. Fr. Richard S. Vosko recognizes that liturgical buildings are metaphorical expressions of the people of God. He proposes, in a relational way, that when all physical and psychological boundaries in a place of worship are removed people will discover a common ground. Building on theological foundations and design principles, Vosko envisions what an egalitarian “servant church” can look like. In a bold but thoughtful manner, he presents progressive insights into the fields of church art and architecture.

The Agent in the Margin

The Agent in the Margin

Author: Clara A.B. Joseph

Publisher: Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press

ISBN: 1554582814

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 247

View: 971

The Agent in the Margin: Nayantara Sahgal’s Gandhian Fiction is a comprehensive study of the literary works of Nayantara Sahgal, daughter of Vijaya Lakshmi Pandit—the first woman president of the United Nations General Assembly—and niece of Jawaharlal Nehru, India’s first prime minister. Clara A.B. Joseph introduces Mahatma Gandhi’s political and philosophical to literary analysis and utilizes non-structuralist aspects of Louis Althusser’s theories of ideology to trace how characters marginalized by gender, class, race, and language in Sahgal’s work assume agency, challenging poststructuralist theories of cultural and ideological determinism. She considers how gender complicates autobiography and how the roles of daughter, virgin, wife, widow, and alien serve (often ironically) to highlight human dignity.

Landscape Architecture as Storytelling

Landscape Architecture as Storytelling

Author: Bob Scarfo

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

ISBN: 9781000779677

Category: Architecture

Page: 398

View: 454

This book introduces students, practitioners, and laypeople to a comfortable approach to learning landscape architectural design free of design jargon and derived from their existing knowledge. A step-by-step process has readers consider their knowledge of language as metaphorically related to basic design and landscape design. Through information delivery and questioning processes, readers build on what they already know, their tacit understanding of language as applied to problem solving and storytelling. Everyone is a storyteller. Taken one step at a time through a three-tiered analogy of language, basic design, and landscape design, readers learn the makeup and role of such design features as points, lines, planes, volumes and sequential volumetric spaces that make up their worlds. With that, in a sense, new world view, and numerous questions and examples, readers begin to see that they in fact daily read the environments in which they live, work, play, raise families, and grow old. Once they realize how they read their surroundings they are helped to recognize that they can build narratives into their surroundings. At that point the existence of authored landscape narratives finds readers understanding a design process that relies on the designer-as-author, landscape-as-text, and participant, user-as-reader. That process has the reader write a first- or second-person narrative, visually interpret the written narrative into a storyboard, and turn the storyboard into a final design, the physical makeup of which is read by those who participate in it.

The Still Life in the Fiction of A. S. Byatt

The Still Life in the Fiction of A. S. Byatt

Author: Elizabeth Hicks

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 9781443824606

Category: Art

Page: 215

View: 358

This book explores the ways in which English writer A. S. Byatt’s visual still lifes (descriptions of real or imagined artworks) and what are termed “verbal still lifes” (scenes such as laid tables, rooms and market stalls) are informed by her veneration of both realism and writing. It examines Byatt’s adoption of the Barthesian concept of textual pleasure, showing how her ekphrastic descriptions involve consumption and take time to unfold for the reader, thereby highlighting the limitations of painting. It also investigates the ways in which Byatt’s still lifes demonstrate her debts to English modernist author Virginia Woolf, French writer Marcel Proust, and the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood of nineteenth-century Britain. A number of Byatt’s verbal still lifes are read as semiotic markers of her characters, particularly with regard to economic status and class. Further, her descriptions uniting food and sexuality are perceived as part of her overall representation of pleasure. Finally, Byatt’s employment of vanitas iconography in many of her portrayals of death is discussed showing how her recurring motif of Keats’s “Ode on a Grecian Urn” teases out the still life’s inherent tension between living passion and “cold” artwork.

J. Henry Shorthouse, the Author of John Inglesant

J. Henry Shorthouse, the Author of John Inglesant

Author: Charles W. Spurgeon

Publisher: Universal-Publishers

ISBN: 9781581121834

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 328

View: 164

When J. Henry Shorthouse (1834-1903) published John Inglesant in 1881, he contributed a unique synthesis of Anglo-Catholic sensibilities to the enduring legacy of the Oxford Movement. Although his "philosophical romance" has been acclaimed "the greatest Anglo-Catholic novel in English literature" and "the one English novel that speaks immediately to human intuition without regard to the reader's own faith or philosophy", his most enduring contributions are the "religion of John Inglesant", an Anglo-Catholic synthesis of obedience and freedom, faith and reason, and the sacramental vision of "the myth of Little Gidding". Afflicted with a lifelong stammer, "the author of John Inglesant" proved himself a master of cadenced rhythms and "enspiritualised" prose in quest of "the great musical novel". Delineating parallels between sixteenth-century and Victorian England, Shorthouse integrated Quietism with Platonism into a religious aesthetic, a sacramental vision of "the Divine Principle of the Platonic Christ". Studied chronologically, Shorthouse's transition from Quaker to "Broad Church Sacramentalist" provides informing comparison with T. S. Eliot's conversion from Unitarian to Anglo-Catholic, as his myth of Little Gidding informs the historical imagination of Eliot's Christian poetry and dramas. The religious and developmental nature of the work of both artists affords analogies with C. G. Jung's psychology of Individuation.

The Cambridge Companion to Jung

The Cambridge Companion to Jung

Author: Polly Young-Eisendrath

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139827987

Category: Philosophy

Page:

View: 314

This second edition represents a wide-ranging critical introduction to the psychology of Carl Jung, one of the founders of psychoanalysis. Including two new essays and thorough revisions of most of the original chapters, it constitutes a radical assessment of his legacy. Andrew Samuels' introduction succinctly articulates the challenges facing the Jungian community. The fifteen essays set Jung in the context of his own time, outline the current practice and theory of Jungian psychology and show how Jungians continue to question and evolve his thinking and apply it to aspects of modern culture and psychoanalysis. The volume includes a full chronology of Jung's life and work, extensively revised and up to date bibliographies, a case study and a glossary. It is an indispensable reference tool for both students and specialists, written by an international team of Jungian analysts and scholars from various disciplines.

Domestic Modernism, the Interwar Novel, and E.H. Young

Domestic Modernism, the Interwar Novel, and E.H. Young

Author: Chiara Briganti

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351943093

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 224

View: 693

Domestic Modernism, the Interwar Novel, and E. H. Young provides a valuable analytical model for reading a large body of modernist works by women, who have suffered not only from a lack of critical attention but from the assumption that experimental modernist techniques are the only expression of the modern. In the process of documenting the publication and reception history of E. H. Young's novels, the authors suggest a paradigm for analyzing the situation of women writers during the interwar years. Their discussion of Young in the context of both canonical and noncanonical writers challenges the generic label and literary status of the domestic novel, as well as facile assumptions about popular and middlebrow fiction, canon formation, aesthetic value, and modernity. The authors also make a significant contribution to discussions of the everyday and to the burgeoning field of 'homeculture,' as they show that the fictional embodiment and inscription of home by writers such as Young, Virginia Woolf, Elizabeth Bowen, Ivy Compton-Burnett, Lettice Cooper, E. M. Delafield, Stella Gibbons, Storm Jameson, and E. Arnot Robertson epitomize the long-standing symbiosis between architecture and literature, or more specifically, between the house and the novel.

Dramaturgy and Architecture

Dramaturgy and Architecture

Author: Cathy Turner

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 9781137317148

Category: Performing Arts

Page: 250

View: 537

Dramaturgy and Architecture approaches modern and postmodern theatre's contribution to the way we think about the buildings and spaces we inhabit. It discusses in detail ways in which theatre and performance have critiqued and intervened in everyday spaces, modelled our dreams or fears and made proposals for the future.

Sites Unseen

Sites Unseen

Author: William A. Gleason

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814732489

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 424

Sites Unseen examines the complex intertwining of race and architecture in nineteenth and early-twentieth century American culture, the period not only in which American architecture came of age professionally in the U.S. but also in which ideas about architecture became a prominent part of broader conversations about American culture, history, politics, and—although we have not yet understood this clearly—race relations. This rich and copiously illustrated interdisciplinary study explores the ways that American writing between roughly 1850 and 1930 concerned itself, often intensely, with the racial implications of architectural space primarily, but not exclusively, through domestic architecture. In addition to identifying an archive of provocative primary materials, Sites Unseen draws significantly on important recent scholarship in multiple fields ranging from literature, history, and material culture to architecture, cultural geography, and urban planning. Together the chapters interrogate a variety of expressive American vernacular forms, including the dialect tale, the novel of empire, letters, and pulp stories, along with the plantation cabin, the West Indian cottage, the Latin American plaza, and the “Oriental” parlor. These are some of the overlooked plots and structures that can and should inform a more comprehensive consideration of the literary and cultural meanings of American architecture. Making sense of the relations between architecture, race, and American writing of the long nineteenth century—in their regional, national, and hemispheric contexts—Sites Unseen provides a clearer view not only of this catalytic era but also more broadly of what architectural historian Dell Upton has aptly termed the social experience of the built environment.