Search Results for: Ancient Forgiveness

Ancient Forgiveness

Ancient Forgiveness

Author: Charles L. Griswold

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521119481

Category: History

Page: 277

View: 671

In this book, eminent scholars of classical antiquity and ancient and medieval Judaism and Christianity explore the nature and place of forgiveness in the pre-modern Western world. They discuss whether the concept of forgiveness, as it is often understood today, was absent, or at all events more restricted in scope than has been commonly supposed, and what related ideas (such as clemency or reconciliation) may have taken the place of forgiveness. An introductory chapter reviews the conceptual territory of forgiveness and illuminates the potential breadth of the idea, enumerating the important questions a theory of the subject should explore. The following chapters examine forgiveness in the contexts of classical Greece and Rome; the Hebrew Bible, the Talmud, and Moses Maimonides; and the New Testament, the Church Fathers, and Thomas Aquinas.

Guilt, Forgiveness, and Moral Repair

Guilt, Forgiveness, and Moral Repair

Author: Maria-Sibylla Lotter

Publisher: Springer Nature

ISBN: 9783030846107

Category: Philosophy

Page: 356

View: 551

In current debates about coming to terms with individual and collective wrongdoing, the concept of forgiveness has played an important but controversial role. For a long time, the idea was widespread that a forgiving attitude — overcoming feelings of resentment and the desire for revenge — was always virtuous. Recently, however, this idea has been questioned. The contributors to this volume do not take sides for or against forgiveness but rather examine its meaning and function against the backdrop of a more complex understanding of moral repair in a variety of social, circumstantial, and cultural contexts. The book aims to gain a differentiated understanding of the European traditions regarding forgiveness, revenge, and moral repair that have shaped our moral intuitions today whilst also examining examples from other cultural contexts (Asia and Africa, in particular) to explore how different cultural traditions deal with the need for moral repair after wrongdoing.

Anger and Forgiveness

Anger and Forgiveness

Author: Martha C. Nussbaum

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780199335893

Category: Philosophy

Page: 208

View: 995

Anger is not just ubiquitous, it is also popular. Many people think it is impossible to care sufficiently for justice without anger at injustice. Many believe that it is impossible for individuals to vindicate their own self-respect or to move beyond an injury without anger. To not feel anger in those cases would be considered suspect. Is this how we should think about anger, or is anger above all a disease, deforming both the personal and the political? In this wide-ranging book, Martha C. Nussbaum, one of our leading public intellectuals, argues that anger is conceptually confused and normatively pernicious. It assumes that the suffering of the wrongdoer restores the thing that was damaged, and it betrays an all-too-lively interest in relative status and humiliation. Studying anger in intimate relationships, casual daily interactions, the workplace, the criminal justice system, and movements for social transformation, Nussbaum shows that anger's core ideas are both infantile and harmful. Is forgiveness the best way of transcending anger? Nussbaum examines different conceptions of this much-sentimentalized notion, both in the Jewish and Christian traditions and in secular morality. Some forms of forgiveness are ethically promising, she claims, but others are subtle allies of retribution: those that exact a performance of contrition and abasement as a condition of waiving angry feelings. In general, she argues, a spirit of generosity (combined, in some cases, with a reliance on impartial welfare-oriented legal institutions) is the best way to respond to injury. Applied to the personal and the political realms, Nussbaum's profoundly insightful and erudite view of anger and forgiveness puts both in a startling new light.

Unmanly Men

Unmanly Men

Author: Brittany E. Wilson

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780199325009

Category: Religion

Page: 360

View: 605

This book examines key male characters in Luke-Acts with respect to constructions of gender and masculinity in the Greco-Roman world. Of all Luke's male characters, four in particular problematise elite masculine norms: Zechariah (the father of John the Baptist), the Ethiopian eunuch, Paul, and, above all, Jesus. These men do not conform to the strictures of elite masculinity, for they do not protect their bodily boundaries nor do they embody corporeal control.

Tregenna Hill

Tregenna Hill

Author: Caitlin Smith Gilson

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 9781666725285

Category: Poetry

Page: 160

View: 837

Tregenna Hill: Altars and Allegories are love poems cutting through and across the many layers of love: personal, historical, religious, and philosophical; an elegy to the beginnings and ends, to the untranslatable moments in time which contain all that is Good and Beautiful. At the altar before God and human intimacy, there remains the gentle yet brutal yoking of eros and agape with innocence, ecstasy, confession, newness, temporality, death, and surrender.

Reconstructing Satyr Drama

Reconstructing Satyr Drama

Author: Andreas Antonopoulos

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110725247

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 928

View: 398

The origins of satyr drama, and particularly the reliability of the account in Aristotle, remains contested, and several of this volume’s contributions try to make sense of the early relationship of satyr drama to dithyramb and attempt to place satyr drama in the pre-Classical performance space and traditions. What is not contested is the relationship of satyr drama to tragedy as a required cap to the Attic trilogy. Here, however, how Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides (to whom one complete play and the preponderance of the surviving fragments belong) envisioned the relationship of satyr drama to tragedy in plot, structure, setting, stage action and language is a complex subject tackled by several contributors. The playful satyr chorus and the drunken senility of Silenos have always suggested some links to comedy and later to Atellan farce and phlyax. Those links are best examined through language, passages in later Greek and Roman writers, and in art. The purpose of this volume is probe as many themes and connections of satyr drama with other literary genres, as well as other art forms, putting satyr drama on stage from the sixth century BC through the second century AD. The editors and contributors suggest solutions to some of the controversies, but the volume shows as much that the field of study is vibrant and deserves fuller attention.

To Cast the First Stone

To Cast the First Stone

Author: Jennifer Knust

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 9780691203126

Category: Bibles

Page: 464

View: 409

The story of the woman taken in adultery features a dramatic confrontation between Jesus and the Pharisees over whether the adulteress should be stoned as the law commands. In response, Jesus famously states, “Let him who is without sin be the first to throw a stone at her.” To Cast the First Stone traces the history of this provocative story from its first appearance to its enduring presence today. Likely added to the Gospel of John in the third century, the passage is often held up by modern critics as an example of textual corruption by early Christian scribes and editors, yet a judgment of corruption obscures the warm embrace the story actually received. Jennifer Knust and Tommy Wasserman trace the story’s incorporation into Gospel books, liturgical practices, storytelling, and art, overturning the mistaken perception that it was either peripheral or suppressed, even in the Greek East. The authors also explore the story’s many different meanings. Taken as an illustration of the expansiveness of Christ’s mercy, the purported superiority of Christians over Jews, the necessity of penance, and more, this vivid episode has invited any number of creative receptions. This history reveals as much about the changing priorities of audiences, scribes, editors, and scholars as it does about an “original” text of John. To Cast the First Stone calls attention to significant shifts in Christian book cultures and the enduring impact of oral tradition on the preservation—and destabilization—of scripture.

Hope, Joy, and Affection in the Classical World

Hope, Joy, and Affection in the Classical World

Author: Ruth R. Caston

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780190627171

Category: Philosophy

Page: 256

View: 407

The emotions have long been an interest for those studying ancient Greece and Rome. But while the last few decades have produced excellent studies of individual emotions and the different approaches to them by the major philosophical schools, the focus has been almost entirely on negative emotions. This might give the impression that the Greeks and Romans had little to say about positive emotion, something that would be misguided. As the chapters in this collection indicate, there are representations of positive emotions extending from archaic Greek poetry to Augustine, and in both philosophical works and literary genres as wide-ranging as lyric poetry, forensic oratory, comedy, didactic poetry, and the novel. Nor is the evidence uniform: while many of the literary representations give expression to positive emotion but also describe its loss, the philosophers offer a more optimistic assessment of the possibilities of attaining joy or contentment in this life. The positive emotions show some of the same features that all emotions do. But unlike the negative emotions, which we are able to describe and analyze in great detail because of our preoccupation with them, positive emotions tend to be harder to articulate. Hence the interest of the present study, which considers how positive emotions are described, their relationship to other emotions, the ways in which they are provoked or upset by circumstances, how they complicate and enrich our relationships with other people, and which kinds of positive emotion we should seek to integrate. The ancient works have a great deal to say about all of these topics, and for that reason deserve more study, both for our understanding of antiquity and for our understanding of the positive emotions in general.

Poet and Orator

Poet and Orator

Author: Andreas Markantonatos

Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG

ISBN: 9783110626988

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 463

View: 452

This multiauthored volume, as well as bringing into clearer focus the notion of drama and oratory as important media of public inquiry and critique, aims to generate significant attention to the unified intentions of the dramatist and the orator to establish favourable conditions of internal stability in democratic Athens. We hope that readers both enjoy and find valuable their engagement with these ideas and beliefs regarding the indissoluble bond between oratorical expertise and dramatic artistry. This exciting collection of studies by worldwide acclaimed classicists and acute younger Hellenists is envisaged as part of the general effort, almost unanimously acknowledged as valid and productive, to explore the impact of formalized speech in particular and craftsmanship rhetoric in general upon Attic drama as a moral and educational force in the Athenian city-state. Both poet and orator seek to deepen the central tensions of their work and to enlarge the main themes of their texts to even broader terms by investing in the art of rhetoric, whilst at the same time, through a skillful handling of events, evaluating the past and establishing standards or ideology.

Joseph

Joseph

Author: Sara Savage

Publisher: SPCK

ISBN: 9780281068104

Category: Religion

Page: 96

View: 982

In this profoundly moving meditation on the character of Joseph in the book of Genesis, Sara Savage takes you on a journey of personal transformation. It is a journey that will lead you to new levels of emotional and spiritual understanding. Like Joseph, every human being needs to learn how to handle life's problems - whether threats to identity, relationship breakdown, depression, bereavement, stress, personal failure or other forms of suffering. Skilfully interweaving psychological and biblical insight, Sara Savage takes you deep into the mind and soul of Joseph as he lives and learns through these experiences. In doing so, she shows how, like Joseph, you too can make something beautiful out of the life that you have been given.