Search Results for: The Memorial History Of The City Of New York

New York City

New York City

Author: Andrew F. Smith

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9781442227132

Category: Cooking

Page: 260

View: 305

New York City’s first food biography showcases all the vibrancy, innovation, diversity, influence, and taste of this most-celebrated American metropolis. Its cuisine has developed as a lively potluck supper, where discrete culinary traditions have survived, thrived, and interacted. For almost 400 years New York’s culinary influence has been felt in other cities and communities worldwide. New York’s restaurants, such as Delmonico’s, created and sustained haute cuisine in this country. Grocery stores and supermarkets that were launched here became models for national food distribution. More cookbooks have been published in New York than in all other American cities combined. Foreign and “fancy” foods, including hamburgers, pizza, hot dogs, Waldorf salad, and baked Alaska, were introduced to Americans through New York’s colorful street vendors, cooks, and restaurateurs. As Smith shows here, the city’s ever-changing culinary life continues to fascinate and satiate both natives and visitors alike.

The Unbounded Community

The Unbounded Community

Author: Kenneth A. Scherzer

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822398752

Category: Social Science

Page: 375

View: 268

Stick ball, stoop sitting, pickle barrel colloquys: The neighborhood occupies a warm place in our cultural memory—a place that Kenneth A. Scherzer contends may have more to do with ideology and nostalgia than with historical accuracy. In this remarkably detailed analysis of neighborhood life in New York City between 1830 and 1875, Scherzer gives the neighborhood its due as a complex, richly textured social phenomenon and helps to clarify its role in the evolution of cities. After a critical examination of recent historical renderings of neighborhood life, Scherzer focuses on the ecological, symbolic, and social aspects of nineteenth-century community life in New York City. Employing a wide array of sources, from census reports and church records to police blotters and brothel guides, he documents the complex composition of neighborhoods that defy simple categorization by class or ethnicity. From his account, the New York City neighborhood emerges as a community in flux, born out of the chaos of May Day, the traditional moving day. The fluid geography and heterogeneity of these neighborhoods kept most city residents from developing strong local attachments. Scherzer shows how such weak spatial consciousness, along with the fast pace of residential change, diminished the community function of the neighborhood. New Yorkers, he suggests, relied instead upon the "unbounded community," a collection of friends and social relations that extended throughout the city. With pointed argument and weighty evidence, The Unbounded Community replaces the neighborhood of nostalgia with a broader, multifaceted conception of community life. Depicting the neighborhood in its full scope and diversity, the book will enhance future forays into urban history.

Courts and Lawyers of New York

Courts and Lawyers of New York

Author: Alden Chester

Publisher: The Lawbook Exchange, Ltd.

ISBN: 9781584774242

Category: History

Page: 1421

View: 617

This massive illustrated history of the courts and lawyers of New York from 1609-1925 contains a great deal of information that is not available elsewhere. Contents: Part I-Dutch Period: The Bases of American Law, The Dutch Legal System, The Patrons and Their Courts, Burgher Government, Dutch Magistrates. Part II-English Period: The Conflicting Land Titles, The Duke of York's Laws, The Leisler Case. Part III-American Period: Constitutional History, The Courts of Last Resort, The Supreme Court, The Court of Chancery. Part IV: Judicial Distracts and Associations of the Bar, Law Libraries and Law Schools. 59 illustrations.