Search Results for: Post Romantic Predicament

Post-Romantic Predicament

Post-Romantic Predicament

Author: Paul de Man

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 9780748656257

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 248

View: 697

The first collection of texts by Paul de Man to follow the posthumous Aesthetic Ideology (1996), the title refers to de Man's Harvard thesis of the late 1950s, from which the long section on Mallarme is reproduced. Also included are texts by de Man on Ste

A SECULAR AGE

A SECULAR AGE

Author: Charles TAYLOR

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674044289

Category: Philosophy

Page: 888

View: 407

The place of religion in society has changed profoundly in the last few centuries, particularly in the West. In what will be a defining book for our time, Taylor takes up the question of what these changes mean, and what, precisely, happens when a society becomes one in which faith is only one human possibility among others.

Post-Romantic Aesthetics in Contemporary British and Irish Poetry

Post-Romantic Aesthetics in Contemporary British and Irish Poetry

Author: Stefanie John

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781000397758

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 248

View: 951

This book demonstrates the legacies of Romanticism which animate the poetry and poetics of Eavan Boland, Gillian Clarke, John Burnside, and Kathleen Jamie. It argues that the English Romantic tradition serves as a source of inspiration and critical contention for these Irish, Welsh, and Scottish poets, and it relates this engagement to wider concerns with gender, nation, and nature which have shaped contemporary poetry in Britain and Ireland. Covering a substantial number of works from the 1980s to the 2010s, the book discusses how Boland and Clarke, as women poets from the Republic of Ireland and Wales, react to a male-dominated and Anglocentric lyric tradition and thus rework notions of the Romantic. It examines how Burnside and Jamie challenge, adopt, and revise Romantic aesthetics of nature and environment. The book is the first in-depth study to read Boland, Clarke, Burnside, and Jamie as post-Romantics. By disentangling the aesthetic and critical conceptions of Romanticism which inform their inheritance, it develops an innovative approach to the understanding of contemporary poetry and literary influence.

The Post-Romantic Predicament

The Post-Romantic Predicament

Author: Paul De Man

Publisher:

ISBN: 074864105X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 235

View: 577

`De Man's readings of Mallarme, Yeats, and George in the 1950s demonstrate how a reflection on an authentically poetic vocation cannot help but produce a concomitant reflection on what constitutes a genuinely literary criticism and theory. It is fascinating to see how de Man's pushing of a Hegalian phenomenological "method" to its limits engenders what we now call "de Manian" rhetorical or "deconstructive" reading. The Post-Romantic Predicament is essential reading for anyone concerned with the question of "the literary".' Andrzej Warminski, University of California, lrvine First publication of a collection of critical texts from Paul de Man's Harvard University Years From 1955-1961 Paul de Man was a Junior Fellow at Harvard University where he wrote a doctoral thesis entitled The Post-Romantic Predicament: a study in the poetry of Mallarme and Yeats'. These texts from this period include de Man's extended considerations of Stephane Mallarme and W. B. Yeats as well as essays on Holderlin, Keats and Stefan George. This writing reflects recognisable concerns for de Man: the figurative dimension of language, the borders between philosophy and literature, the ideological obfuscations of Romanticism, and the difficulties of the North American heritage of New Criticism. These essays, brought together from the Paul de Man papers at the University of California (Irvine), make a significant contribution to the cultural history of deconstruction, and to the present state of literary theory.

Karen Tei Yamashita

Karen Tei Yamashita

Author: A. Robert Lee

Publisher: University of Hawaii Press

ISBN: 9780824874056

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 216

View: 776

Karen Tei Yamashita’s novels, essays, and performance scripts have garnered considerable praise from scholars and reviewers, and are taught not only in the United States but in at least half a dozen countries in Asia, South America, and Europe. Her work has been written about in numerous disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Karen Tei Yamashita: Fictions of Magic and Memory is the first anthology given over to Yamashita’s writing. It contains newly commissioned essays by established, international scholars; a recent interview with the author; a semiautobiographical keynote address delivered at an international conference that ruminates on her Japanese American heritage; and a full bibliography. The essays offer fresh and in-depth readings of the magic realist canvas of Through the Arc of the Rain Forest (1990); the Japanese emigrant portraiture of Brazil-Maru (1992); Los Angeles as rambunctious geopolitical and transnational fulcrum of the Americas in Tropic of Orange (1997); the fraught relationship of Japanese and Brazilian heritage and labor in Circle K Cycles (2001); Asian American history and politics of the 1960s in I Hotel (2010); and Anime Wong (2014), a gallery of performativity illustrating the contested and inextricable nature of East and West. This essay-collection explores Yamashita’s use of the fantastical, the play of emerging transnational ethnicity, and the narrative tactics of reflexivity and bricolage in storytelling located on a continuum of the unique and the communal, of the past and the present, and that are mapped in various spatial and virtual realities.

The Fate of Progress in British Romanticism

The Fate of Progress in British Romanticism

Author: Mark Canuel

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780192895301

Category: Romanticism

Page: 251

View: 516

What did Romantic writers mean when they wrote about progress and perfection? This book shows how Romantic writers inventively responded to familiar ideas about political progress which they inherited from the eighteenth century. Whereas earlier writers such as Voltaire and John Millar likened improvements in political institutions to the progress of the sciences or refinement of manners, the novelists, poets, and political theorists examined in this book reimagined politically progressive thinking in multiple genres. While embracing a commitment to optimistic improvement--increasing freedom, equality, and protection from injury--they also cultivated increasingly visible and volatile energies of religious and political dissent. Earlier narratives of progress tended not only to edit and fictionalize history but also to agglomerate different modes of knowledge and practice in their quest to describe and prescribe uniform cultural improvement. But romantic writers seize on internal division and take it less as an occasion for anxiety, exclusion, or erasure, and more as an impetus to rethink the groundwork of progress itself. Political entities, from Percy Shelley's plans for political reform to Charlotte Smith's motley associations of strangers in The Banished Man, are progressive because they advance some version of collective utility or common good. But they simultaneously stake a claim to progress only insofar as they paradoxically solicit contending vantage points on the criteria for the very public benefit which they passionately pursue. The majestic edifices of Wordsworth's imagined university in The Prelude embrace members who are republican or pious, not to mention the recalcitrant enthusiast who is the poet himself.

Thought’s Wilderness

Thought’s Wilderness

Author: Greg Ellermann

Publisher: Stanford University Press

ISBN: 9781503633018

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 251

View: 332

While much recent ecocriticism has questioned the value of nature as a concept, Thought's Wilderness insists that it is analytically and politically indispensable, and that romanticism shows us why. Without a concept of nature, Greg Ellermann argues, our thinking is limited to the world that capitalism has made. Defamiliarizing the tradition of romantic nature writing, Ellermann contends that the romantics tried to circumvent the domination of nature that is essential to modern capitalism. As he shows, poets and philosophers in the period such as Immanuel Kant, G. W. F. Hegel, Mary Wollstonecraft, William Wordsworth, and Percy Shelley were highly attuned to nature's ephemeral, ungraspable forms: clouds of vapor, a trace of ruin, deep silence, and the "world-surrounding ether." Further, he explains how nature's vanishing—its vulnerability and its flight from apprehension—became a philosophical and political problem. In response to a nascent industrial capitalism, romantic writers developed a poetics of wilderness—a poetics that is attentive to fleeting presence and that seeks to let things be. Trying to imagine what ultimately eludes capture, the romantics recognized the complicity between conceptual and economic domination, and they saw how thought itself could become a technology for control. This insight, Ellermann proposes, motivates romantic efforts to think past capitalist instrumentality and its devastation of the world. Ultimately, this new work undertakes a fundamental rethinking of the aesthetics and politics of nature.

Libraries, Literatures, and Archives

Libraries, Literatures, and Archives

Author: Sas Mays

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781135013851

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 290

View: 744

Not only does the library have a long and complex history and politics, but it has an ambivalent presence in Western culture – both a site of positive knowledge and a site of error, confusion, and loss. Nevertheless, in literary studies and in the humanities, including book history, the figure of the library remains in many senses under-researched. This collection brings together established and up-and-coming researchers from a number of practices – literary and cultural studies, gender studies, book history, philosophy, visual culture, and contemporary art –with an effective historical sweep ranging from the time of Sumer to the present day. In the context of the rise of archive studies, this book attends specifically and meta-critically to the figure of the library as a particular archival form, considering the traits that constitute (or fail to constitute) the library as institution or idea, and questions its relations to other accumulative modes, such as the archive in its traditional sense, the museum, or the filmic or digital archive. Across their diversity, and in addition to their international standard of research and writing, each chapter is unified by commitment to analyzing the complex cultural politics of the library form.

Serenity in Crisis

Serenity in Crisis

Author: Ortwin de Graef

Publisher: U of Nebraska Press

ISBN: 0803216947

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 270

View: 193

A polymath well versed in European literature and philosophy, one of the founders of deconstruction, and a widely respected teacher, Paul de Man brought unprecedented attention and acclaim to the so-called Yale Critics. His fame was at a zenith when he died suddenly in 1983. A few years later, Ortwin de Graef found the de Man had written for the collaborationist press during the Nazi occupation, a discovery that ignited an international reassessment of de Man's work. Serenity in Crisis is the first sustained account of the complex, intertextual tradition in which de Man wrote and of the persistent concerns expressed in his early work. It reconstructs the truth-models with which de Man justified his political choice before and during the occupation and traces them back to an ambitious intention to integrate the competing truths of the natural sciences, the social sciences, and literature. The significance of de Man's ideational framework and the decisions that followed from it have extended well beyond the disasters of World War II. De Graef clearly illuminates and critiques the abstruse paths of logic in de Man's early writings as well as in the reformulations of de Man's thought expressed in his writings of the 1950s.