Search Results for: Bottom Line Business

The Triple Bottom Line

The Triple Bottom Line

Author: Andrew Savitz

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781118226223

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 352

View: 743

The classic guide to sustainability strategy and implementation—updated for today's businesses To ensure business success, companies must embrace sustainable management. Firms need to find the overlap between business interests and the interests of society and the environment before they can secure a lasting competitive edge. By making the case for sustainability as a fundamental business practice, The Triple Bottom Line became an instant classic when first published in 2006, showing a generation of business leaders how to find their sustainability sweet spot—where profitability merges seamlessly with the common good. Now updated with ground-breaking stories of successes and failure, this revision of The Triple Bottom Line is a critical resource for all managers and leaders. Features in-depth success stories of sustainability practices at major firms such as Wal-Mart, GE, DuPont, American Electric Power, and PepsiCo—and shows why companies such as BP and Hershey continue to fail Draws on Andy Savitz's 25 years of pioneering consulting and research in the field Includes all-new reporting and analysis on the practice of sustainability and the triple bottom line in business today, providing new insights on where sustainability is headed The Triple Bottom Line is essential reading for any firm to meet the challenge of creating lasting value for both shareholders and society.

Emotional Terrors in the Workplace: Protecting Your Business' Bottom Line

Emotional Terrors in the Workplace: Protecting Your Business' Bottom Line

Author: Vali Hawkins Mitchell

Publisher: Rothstein Associates Inc

ISBN: 1931332274

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 390

View: 457

Annotation Reasonable variations of human emotions are expected at the workplace. People have feelings. Emotions that accumulate, collect force, expand in volume and begin to spin are another matter entirely. Spinning emotions can become as unmanageable as a tornado, and in the workplace they can cause just as much damage in terms of human distress and economic disruption. All people have emotions. Normal people and abnormal people have emotions. Emotions happen at home and at work. So, understanding how individuals or groups respond emotionally in a business situation is important in order to have a complete perspective of human beings in a business function. Different people have different sets of emotions. Some people let emotions roll off their back like water off a duck. Other people swallow emotions and hold them in until they become toxic waste that needs a disposal site. Some have small simple feelings and others have large, complicated emotions. Stresses of life tickle our emotions or act as fuses in a time bomb. Stress triggers emotion. Extreme stress complicates the wide range of varying emotional responses. Work is a stressor. Sometimes work is an extreme stressor. Since everyone has emotion, it is important to know what kinds of emotion are regular and what kinds are irregular, abnormal, or damaging within the business environment. To build a strong, well-grounded, value-added set of references for professional discussions and planning for Emotional Continuity Management a manager needs to know at least the basics about human emotion. Advanced knowledge is preferable. Emotional Continuity Management planning for emotions that come from the stress caused by changes inside business, from small adjustments to catastrophic upheavals, requires knowing emotional and humanity-based needs and functions of people and not just technology and performance data. Emergency and Disaster Continuity planners sometimes posit the questions,?What if during a disaster your computer is working, but no one shows up to use it? What if no one is working the computer because they are terrified to show up to a worksite devastated by an earthquake or bombing and they stay home to care for their children?? The Emotional Continuity Manager asks,?What if no one is coming or no one is producing even if they are at the site because they are grieving or anticipating the next wave of danger? What happens if employees are engaged in emotional combat with another employee through gossip, innuendo, or out-and-out verbal warfare? And what if the entire company is in turmoil because we have an Emotional Terrorist who is just driving everyone bonkers?" The answer is that, in terms of bottom-line thinking, productivity is productivity? and if your employees are not available because their emotions are not calibrated to your industry standards, then fiscal risks must be considered. Human compassion needs are important. And so is money. Employees today face the possibility of biological, nuclear, incendiary, chemical, explosive, or electronic catastrophe while potentially working in the same cubicle with someone ready to suicide over personal issues at home. They face rumors of downsizing and outsourcing while watching for anthrax amidst rumors that co-workers are having affairs. An employee coughs, someone jokes nervously about SARS, or teases a co-worker about their hamburger coming from a Mad Cow, someone laughs, someone worries, and productivity can falter as minds are not on tasks. Emotions run rampant in human lives and therefore at work sites. High-demand emotions demonstrated by complicated workplace relationships, time-consuming divorce proceedings, addiction behaviors, violence, illness, and death are common issues at work sites which people either manage well? or do not manage well. Low-demand emotions demonstrated by annoyances, petty bickering, competition, prejudice, bias, minor power struggles, health variables, politics and daily grind feelings take up mental space as well as emotional space. It is reasonable to assume that dramatic effects from a terrorist attack, natural disaster, disgruntled employee shooting, or natural death at the work site would create emotional content. That content can be something that develops, evolves and resolves, or gathers speed and force like a tornado to become a spinning energy event with a life of its own. Even smaller events, such as a fully involved gossip chain or a computer upgrade can lead to the voluntary or involuntary exit of valuable employees. This can add energy to an emotional spin and translate into real risk features such as time loss, recruitment nightmares, disruptions in customer service, additional management hours, remediations and trainings, consultation fees, Employee Assistance Program (EAP) dollars spent, Human Resources (HR) time spent, administrative restructuring, and expensive and daunting litigations. Companies that prepare for the full range of emotions and therefore emotional risks, from annoyance to catastrophe, are better equipped to adjust to any emotionally charged event, small or large. It is never a question of if something will happen to disrupt the flow of productivity, it is only a question of when and how large. Emotions that ebb and flow are functional in the workplace. A healthy system should be able to manage the ups and downs of emotions. Emotions directly affect the continuity of production and services, customer and vendor relations and essential infrastructure. Unstable emotional infrastructure in the workplace disrupts business through such measurable costs as medical and mental health care, employee retention and retraining costs, time loss, or legal fees. Emotional Continuity Management is reasonably simple for managers when they are provided the justifiable concepts, empirical evidence that the risks are real, a set of correct tools and instructions in their use. What has not been easy until recently has been convincing the?powers that be? that it is value-added work to deal directly and procedurally with emotions in the workplace. Businesses haven?t seen emotions as part of the working technology and have done everything they can do to avoid the topic. Now, cutting-edge companies are turning the corner. Even technology continuity managers are talking about human resources benefits and scrambling to find ways to evaluate feelings and risks. Yes, times are changing. Making a case for policy to manage emotions is now getting easier. For all the pain and horror associated with the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, employers are getting the message that no one is immune to crisis. In today''''s heightened security environments the demands of managing complex workplace emotions have increased beyond the normal training supplied by in-house Human Resources (HR) professionals and Employee Assistance Plans (EAPs). Many extremely well-meaning HR and EAP providers just do not have a necessary training to manage the complicated strata of extreme emotional responses. Emotions at work today go well beyond the former standards of HR and EAP training. HR and EAP providers now must have advanced trauma management training to be prepared to support employees. The days of easy emotional management are over. Life and work is much too complicated. Significant emotions from small to extreme are no longer the sole domain of HR, EAP, or even emergency first responders and counselors. Emotions are spinning in the very midst of your team, project, cubicle, and company. Emotions are not just at the scene of a disaster. Emotions are present. And because they are not?controllable,? human emotions are not subject to being mandated. Emotions are going to happen. There are many times when emotions cannot be simply outsourced to an external provider of services. There are many times that a manager will face an extreme emotional reaction. Distressed people will require management regularly. That?s your job.

The Triple Bottom Line

The Triple Bottom Line

Author: Adrian Henriques

Publisher: Earthscan

ISBN: 9781849773348

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 209

View: 495

The concept of the 'triple bottom line' (TBL) - the idea that business activity can simultaneously deliver financial, social and environmental benefits - was introduced in the early 1990s. A decade on, The Triple Bottom Line: Does it All Add Up? brings together the world's leading experts on corporate responsibility to assess the implications, benefits and limitations of the TBL. This collection provides a review of what has already been achieved in stimulating change in corporate culture and bringing businesses to an appreciation of the importance and benefits of corporate social responsibility (CSR) and good environmental performance. It further explores the conceptual and practical limits of the metaphor of the TBL and sets out what can be achieved through regulation and legislation, presenting detailed professional procedures for environmental accounting and management and social auditing. The contributors' wealth of experience and insight provides a vivid picture of how much attention is now being focused by businesses on delivering more than just financial targets, and they clearly outline the necessary steps for successfully continuing along this trajectory.

Beyond the Triple Bottom Line

Beyond the Triple Bottom Line

Author: Francisco Szekely

Publisher: MIT Press

ISBN: 9780262035996

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 248

View: 390

A pragmatic new business model for sustainability that outlines eight steps that range from exploring a mission to promoting innovation; with case studies. Many recent books make the case for businesses to become more sustainable, but few explain the specifics. In this book, Francisco Szekely and Zahir Dossa offer a pragmatic new business model for sustainability that extends beyond the traditional framework of the triple bottom line, describing eight steps that range from exploring a vision and establishing a strategy to implementing the strategy and promoting innovation. Szekely and Dossa argue that businesses and organizations need to move away from the business case for sustainability toward a sustainable business model. That is, businesses should go beyond the usual short-term focus on minimizing harm while maximizing profits. Instead, businesses on the path to sustainability should, from the start, focus on addressing a societal need and view profitability not as an end but as a means to support the sustainable organization. Szekely and Dossa explore key problems organizations face when pursuing a sustainability agenda. Each chapter presents one of the eight steps, describes a business dilemma for sustainability, provides a theoretically grounded strategic framework, offers case studies that illustrate the dilemma, and summarizes key findings; the case studies draw on the experiences of such companies as Tesla Motors, Patagonia, TOMs, and Panera. The book emphasizes leadership, arguing that leaders who question the status quo, inspire others, and take risks are essential for achieving sustainable business practices.

Implementing Triple Bottom Line Sustainability into Global Supply Chains

Implementing Triple Bottom Line Sustainability into Global Supply Chains

Author: Lydia Bals

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781351285117

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 394

View: 475

The global sustainability challenge is urgent, tremendous and increasing. From an ecological perspective, the current worldwide resource footprint requires approximately 1.5 planets to sustain existing life, and with current usage would require two planets by 2030. The social impact of ever-growing resource use disproportionately affects the world’s poor – the 3 billion people living on less than $2.50 a day, as they struggle to acquire what is needed to survive. The serious ecological and social challenges we face in trying to establish global sustainable supply chains must not be underestimated, yet so far research has largely ignored the social dimension in favour of the environmental and economic. So how can we develop business strategies that move away from a primary economic focus and give equal weight to people, planet and profit? How can we create sustainable supply chains that take a true triple-bottom-line approach?Implementing Triple Bottom Line Sustainability into Global Supply Chains features innovative research, highlighting new cases, approaches and concepts in how to successfully implement sustainability – covering economic, ecological and social dimensions – into global supply chains. The four parts cover the rationale for sustainable global supply chains, key enablers, case studies showing clear implementation steps, and directions for future research and development.This book is a must-read for any academic researching in sustainable supply chain management, procurement or business strategy, and for business leaders seeking cases that will inform a critical step forward for CSR programmes.

Bottom-Line Organization Development

Bottom-Line Organization Development

Author: Merrill Anderson

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136426148

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 232

View: 670

Organization development practitioners have, for over half a century, engaged with organizations to help them grow and thrive. The artful application of Organization Development (OD) has helped business leaders articulate vision, rethink business processes, create more fluid organization structures and better utilize people's talents. While business leaders and OD practitioners intuitively believe that OD provides valuable results, rigorous measurement of the value delivered has long eluded many OD practitioners. 'Bottom-Line Organization Development' provides powerful tools to capture and measure the financial return on investment (ROI) of OD projects to the business. Given the increasing competition for budget and resources within organizations and the requirements of demonstrating tangible results, the need for such OD measurement tools is very high. But in addition to proving the value of OD projects, integrating evaluation into the change management process itself can actually increase the value of the change initiative because it opens up new ways of capturing and increasing the value of change initiatives. In other words, there is an ROI to ROI. Merrill Anderson calls this new way of approaching OD "strategic change valuation." The book explains the five steps in the OD value process - diagnosis, design, deployment, evaluation and reflection. In addition, three case studies take readers through the process of applying bottom-line OD to three types of popular strategic change initiatives: executive coaching, organization capability, and knowledge management. Readers will gain a holistic perspective of how to make the seemingly intangible benefits of these initiatives tangible.

The New Bottom Line

The New Bottom Line

Author: Alan Mitchell

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9781841125961

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 276

View: 330

This radical, provocative and inspiring book explores a tectonicshift at the very heart of business. A shift that?s making the oldbottom line of corporate profitability the servant of a new master:a new ?person-centric? bottom line of personal profitability orvalue ?in my life?. So what? No bottom line? No more profit? Of course not! Every organization must cover its costs. Everybusiness has to make a profit to survive. The authors of The NewGlobal Line remarkably show that the necessary requirements fordoing so are changing, and why this transformation ? containingimportant elements of both evolution and revolution ? is under way,how it?s undermining the foundations of once-great businesses andbrands, and how its throwing up huge new opportunities.

Triple Bottom Line Risk Management

Triple Bottom Line Risk Management

Author: Adrian R. Bowden

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 9780471217428

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 336

View: 735

An innovative, new approach to risk assessment and management that will help you uncover countless opportunities for your company If a business wants to be sustainable in the twenty-first century, it should focus on the continuous improvements and potential opportunities that risk management offers. Written by risk management experts, this book will provide you with the necessary tools and guidance for the successful management of business risk so you can improve your company's triple bottom line-- the social, environmental, and financial accountability of your business. The authors introduce the RISQUE method, which was specifically developed to address a diverse range of events and issues. It offers a multifaceted approach, using a rational process, which will help you make informed, defensible risk management decisions. You'll gain a better understanding of the methodology, assumptions, advantages, and disadvantages of this approach. You'll also see how the method can be applied to specific areas within your business to reduce risk and increase opportunities. And you'll learn the necessary skills to implement a risk management process that will demonstrate commitment to triple bottom line management. To enhance the material presented, numerous case studies are included that will help you understand how to: * Select and justify the best option for a project * Determine how much additional liability you'll gain through an acquisition * Account for nonquantifiable events * Understand how much your company needs to set aside for future liabilities * Discover which asset management strategy gives you the best return * Use loss of life as a measure of risk to public safety * Calculate and report contingent liability on your balance sheet * Develop an insurance strategy based on your profile of risk

The Blackboard and the Bottom Line

The Blackboard and the Bottom Line

Author: Larry Cuban

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674030091

Category: Education

Page: 272

View: 809

"Ford Motor Company would not have survived the competition had it not been for an emphasis on results. We must view education the same way," the U.S. Secretary of Education declared in 2003. But is he right? In this provocative new book, Larry Cuban takes aim at the alluring cliché that schools should be more businesslike, and shows that in its long history in business-minded America, no one has shown that a business model can be successfully applied to education. In this straight-talking book, one of the most distinguished scholars in education charts the Gilded Age beginnings of the influential view that American schools should be organized to meet the needs of American businesses, and run according to principles of cost-efficiency, bottom-line thinking, and customer satisfaction. Not only are schools by their nature not businesslike, Cuban argues, but the attempt to run them along business lines leads to dangerous over-standardization--of tests, and of goals for our children. Why should we think that there is such a thing as one best school? Is "college for all" achievable--or even desirable? Even if it were possible, do we really want schools to operate as bootcamps for a workforce? Cuban suggests that the best business-inspired improvement for American education would be more consistent and sustained on-the-job worker training, tailored for the job to be done, and business leaders' encouragement--and adoption--of an ethic of civic engagement and public service.

Green Electronics/Green Bottom Line

Green Electronics/Green Bottom Line

Author: Lee H Goldberg

Publisher: Elsevier

ISBN: 9780080507590

Category: Medical

Page: 340

View: 661

Environmentally safe engineering is one of the hottest and most controversial topics in technical circles. Though many publications offer theory and intellectual discussion of the topic, this book provides practical, hands-on advice including hints and tips from the nation's top engineers. Green Electronics/Green Bottom Line offers practical advice for engineers and managers who want or need to incorporate environmental issues into the design process. The emerging discipline of Design for the Environment (DfE) combines engineering know-how with environmental awareness. Topics include international policy issues such as ISO 14000, materials selection (e.g., for recyclability), manufacturing concerns like no-flux processes, and design issues such as power consumption. Real-world cases show how these elements can be included in everyday designs. Each chapter opens with a topical cartoon and lively story, interview or editorial. The discussion will then move to specific engineering issues and their economic and social context. The last section explores larger possibilities and new directions still to be explored by engineers concerned with education, health, and environmental quality. Contributors include engineers from Motorola, Analog Devices, Dupont, Compaq, Nortel, AMD, and Apple Computer, and academics from universities in the US, Canada, the UK, and Europe, as well as the Rocky Mountain Institute. An everyday guide to environmentally sound electronics design Contributors include top engineers from the biggest electronics manufacturers and most prestigious universities Real-world cases illustrate topics giving concepts the reader can apply immediately